Mayumi's Feed
Apr 27, 2011

Q+A: What’s going on at Japan’s damaged nuclear power

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japanese engineers are struggling to gain control of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, 240 km (150 miles) north of Tokyo, which was seriously damaged by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami.

Two of the six reactors at the plant, operated by Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO), are considered stable but the other four are volatile.

Apr 27, 2011

Q+A-What’s going on at Japan’s damaged nuclear power plant?

TOKYO, April 27 (Reuters) – Japanese engineers are
struggling to gain control of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear
power plant, 240 km (150 miles) north of Tokyo, which was
seriously damaged by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami.

Two of the six reactors at the plant, operated by Tokyo
Electric Power Co (TEPCO), are considered stable but the
other four are volatile.

Apr 18, 2011

Japan’s nuclear crisis could drag on way beyond timetable

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s Tokyo Electric Power Co faces big hurdles to hitting its goal of safely shutting down its crippled nuclear reactors in six to nine months and the crisis — including radiation leaks into the sea and air.

A list of the things that could go wrong shows that the operation could take longer — or be derailed altogether if unknown factors are considered, like another powerful quake.

Apr 18, 2011

Analysis – Japan’s crisis could drag on way beyond timetable

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s Tokyo Electric Power Co faces big hurdles to hitting its goal of safely shutting down its crippled nuclear reactors in six to nine months and the crisis — including radiation leaks into the sea and air.

A list of the things that could go wrong shows that the operation could take longer — or be derailed altogether if unknown factors are considered, like another powerful quake.

Apr 18, 2011

Analysis: Japan nuclear crisis could drag on way past timetable

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s Tokyo Electric Power Co faces big hurdles to hitting its goal of safely shutting down its crippled nuclear reactors in six to nine months and the crisis — including radiation leaks into the sea and air.

A list of the things that could go wrong shows that the operation could take longer — or be derailed altogether if unknown factors are considered, like another powerful quake.

Apr 14, 2011

Q+A-Risks at each reactor of Japan’s stricken plant

TOKYO, April 14 (Reuters) – The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear
power plant at the centre of Japan’s crisis has six reactors.
The plant is operated by Tokyo Electric Power Co
(TEPCO).

The following summarises the main risks as Japanese
engineers scramble to deal with the worst nuclear crisis since
the 1986 Chernobyl meltdown:

Apr 14, 2011

Calls grow for Japan PM to quit in wake of quake

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s fragile post-disaster political truce unraveled on Thursday as the head of the main opposition party called on unpopular Prime Minister Naoto Kan to quit over his handling of the country’s natural calamities and a nuclear crisis.

At the stricken Fukushima Daiichi plant in the northeast of the country, engineers were struggling to find a new way to cool one of the six crippled reactors as a large amount of radioactive water kept workers from reaching an internal cooling system knocked out by a March 11 tsunami to reconnect it.

Apr 13, 2011

Q+A-What’s going on at Japan’s damaged nuclear power plant?

TOKYO, April 13 (Reuters) – Japanese engineers are
struggling to gain control of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear
power plant, 240 km (150 miles) north of Tokyo, which was
seriously damaged by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami.

Two of the six reactors at the plant, operated by Tokyo
Electric Power Co (TEPCO), are considered stable but the
other four are volatile.

Apr 12, 2011

Q+A-How does Fukushima differ from Chernobyl?

TOKYO, April 12 (Reuters) – Japan on Tuesday raised the
severity level of its nuclear crisis to put it on par with the
1986 Chernobyl accident, the world’s worst nuclear power
disaster.

But for all their criticism of how Tokyo Electric Power Co
and Japan’s government are handling the crisis at the
Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, experts agree with them
on one point: Fukushima is not another Chernobyl.

Apr 12, 2011

Japan raises nuclear crisis to same level as Chernobyl

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan raised the severity of its nuclear crisis to the highest level on Tuesday, putting it on a par with the world’s worst nuclear disaster at Chernobyl in 1986.

As another major aftershock rattled the earthquake-ravaged east of the country, a fire broke out at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant though engineers later appeared to have extinguished the blaze.