MediaFile

What makes Sumner run?

August 24, 2007

monavie_bottles2.jpgWhat puts the glide in Sumner Redstone’s stride? According to Fortune Magazine it’s a special nostrum made from a Brazilian berry, and it makes the octogenarian executive chairman of Viacom feel like a kid again. Or at least, like a middle-aged man.

Redstone’s preferred beverage is called MonaVie, and it’s not available in stores. Only registered representatives are permitted to sell it.

According to MonaVie’s website, the beverage includes the fruits of 19 juices, most notably acai berry, which is rich in antioxidants. People that drink MonaVie claim it does a body good for a whole host of ailments, from sore joints to sleeplessness to sluggishness, according to these testimonials on YouTube.

Whatever MonaVie is good for, it doesn’t come cheap–a bottle of the stuff costs $40, which may be why it’s packaging makes it look more like a Bordeaux than a regular juice.

Sumner Redstone, 84, says the drink makes him feel like he’s 40. All the more strength to squabble with his daughter in public.

Comments
2 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

If all of the skeptics would just take the time to read all of the research that’s already been done on acai and then all of the research that the developers of MonaVie have done to arrive at the blend of juice, then they would know how much good it is for the body and why the cost is somewhat higher than similar juice of lesser quality. Then if the skeptics would just get into their heads that joining as a member allows them to buy the juice at wholesale prices, regardless if they choose not to share it with others, how much better that would be for their budget while getting healthier. Getting healthier doesn’t necessarily mean that one will feel any difference but the body is still getting the nutrients it needs.

 

Health benefits of the acai berry include its anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, antioxidant and antimutagenic properties, and its benefits for the cardiovascular system.

Acai fruit contains Omega-3 and Omega-6 as well as Omega-9 which help lower “bad” cholesterol.

The following information on acai is from wikipedia

The Acai Fruit
Acai berries are harvested as food. In a study of three traditional Caboclo populations in the Amazon region of Brazil, acai palm was described as the most important plant species because the acai fruit makes up such a major component of diet (up to 42% of the total food intake by weight) and is economically valuable in the region (Murrieta et al., 1999).

The juice and pulp of acai fruits (Euterpe oleracea) are frequently used in various juice blends, smoothies, sodas, and other beverages. In northern Brazil, açaí is traditionally served in gourds called “cuias” with tapioca and sometimes sugar. Acai has become a fad in southern Brazil where it is consumed cold as açaí na tigela (“açaí in the bowl”), mostly mixed with granola – a fad where acai is considered as an energizer. Acai is also widely consumed in Brazil as an ice cream flavor or juice.

As acai deteriorates rapidly after harvest, its raw material is generally only available outside the immediate growing region as acai juice or acai fruit pulp that has been frozen, dried acai, or freeze-dried. However, several companies now manufacture acai juices, other health drinks, and sorbets made from acai berries, often in combination with other fruits.

The above information is from wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acai
Acai fruit is sold in various different forms. Pure dried acai, organic acai, acai juice, acai supplements, acai pulp and so on.

The Foundation for Health http://www.foundationhealth.com

 

Post Your Comment

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/