MediaFile

Pitching your parents on PR

October 18, 2007

Public relations executives have it bad enough — pitching ideas to rude, busy or bored reporters can make for a very long and tough day.

Now it seems Ogilvy Public Relations Worldwide is determined to make life even harder for its staffers. The agency has established “Bring Your Parents to Work Day,” an annual event for moms and dads that have no clue what their kids are up to at work.

We imagine that PR types are like the rest of us when it comes to dealing with parents. That is to say, most of us workers make our jobs sound slightly more glamorous than they really are when we’re chatting with our folks.

For Ogilvy staffers, those little white lies are about to be a thing of the past.

“Employees have found that their parents are often confused about PR, even though they are exposed to it every day when they read a great review about a new product or respond to coverage of a company’s crisis, to name a few,” according to a press release from Ogilvy.”

What can your folks expect?

“As part of the day’s festivities, parents will attend a classroom-style PR 101 lesson, receive an overview of the core business practices of Ogilvy PR, and engage in a brainstorm session and mock presentation.”

Then they pitch The New York Times. Not.

Comments
One comment so far | RSS Comments RSS

After spending so many years in PR and having explained the contents of a PR professionals job, parents and in laws still ask,:but what exactly do you do?

This a wonderful idea. Will finally put a stop to such questions. I think all PR firms should attempt something similar.

Posted by vandana kakar | Report as abusive
 

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