Keep an eye on: Hollywood pink slips

January 10, 2008

godzilla.jpgWarner Brothers has told about 1,000 TV and film employees they can expect some layoffs soon because of the Hollywood screenwriters strike, firing a new volley in the dispute over how writers will get compensation for digitally distributed entertainment.

The Time Warner-owned studio invoked federal and California law to explain why it delivered the warning notices, and said it hoped to bring employees that are laid off back to work once the Writers Guild of America strike comes to an end. Warner Brothers did not say how many people may actually be laid off.

Some industry watchers say that Warner, and maybe other studios down the line, may use such notices to help drive home their view of a strike that is already wreaking more havoc in Hollywood than a clash between Godzilla and King Kong.

“In part this is probably a negotiating tactic because the studios want to continue emphasizing the collateral damage of the strike,” Jonathan Handel, an entertainment lawyer at TroyGould, told the New York Post.

Sounds like its worth checking the mail.

(Reuters)

(NYPost)

Keep an eye on:

  • CBS and the Writers Guild of America settled a three-year-old contract impasse, reaching a tentative employment agreement for 500 newswriters, editors and others. (NYTimes)
  • NBC News’ broadcast of a stripped-down Golden Globe Awards on Sunday raises questions about the heavy influence of the entertainment division on its sister news organization. (LATimes)
  • MySpace unveiled a new MySpace Celebrity site devoted to entertainment culture. The portal will feature news, including gossip aggregated from People magazine’s Web site, blogs, and multimedia content. (CNET)

(Photo: Reuters)

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