MediaFile

Microsoft, Yahoo deadline looms

April 25, 2008

hourglass.jpgWith earnings reports for Yahoo and Microsoft out of the way, all eyes are now on Saturday, Microsoft’s deadline for Yahoo to accept its $43 billion offer.

And just in case Yahoo felt Ballmer’s comments were vague, Microsoft CFO Chris Liddell repeated: “We have yet to see tangible evidence that our bid substantially undervalues the company (Yahoo) … In fact, we see the opposite.”

Will they stay or will they go?

Alley Insider’s Henry Blodget is betting there’s a 60 percent chance Microsoft walks. After reporting a mixed quarter and below-target forecast, it’s looking unlikely Microsoft will raise its bid.

The X-factor: what will Time Warner do over the weekend if Microsoft walks?

(Reuters)

Keep an eye on:

  • AOL’s sites show gains in traffic. (WSJ)
  • comScore defends its analysis of Google’s paid click data. (AlleyInsider)
  • Yahoo expands data sharing among friends online. (Reuters)
  • Second Life gets Organic CEO. (Reuters) (video)
  • WPP’s first quarter revenue growth hit by weakness in Western Europe. North America holds up better. (Reuters)
  • Google close to buying Digg.com? (AllThingsD)

(Photo: Reuters)

Comments
One comment so far | RSS Comments RSS

If Yahoo is acquired by Microsoft, then I wonder if the brand-name will survive?

In particular, what happens to all those broadband service providers who have closely aligned their consumer online business strategy with the Yahoo brand.

An example is the AT&T Yahoo DSL service (previously SBC Yahoo). The thinking behind the partnerships were that telcos understand broadband access, and Yahoo knew how to deliver all the Web services (like email, etc).

Ironically, several broadband service providers had previously partnered with Microsoft, and utilized their MSN offerings, only to conclude that they were a poor choice — when compared to the alternatives.

Therefore, with Microsoft potentially gaining influence over Yahoo, will those broadband service provides gravitate to their current nemesis — Google?

My point, will it be better for BSPs to align with the perceived enemy, than to settle for the proven inept?

 

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