MediaFile

Apple races past Google, IBM in sight

August 13, 2008

Olympics heat

Apple’s market cap edged over Google’s to hit $159 billion today (kudos to AllThingsDigital’s John Paczkowski for spotting this).

Is the maker of the iPhone, iPod and Mac worth more than the top Internet company’s $157 billion? How soon might either beat tech stalwart IBM, which is now worth $170 billion?

Mull over these stats to help you decide, courtesy of Reuters Estimates:

Forecast fiscal 2008 revenue
IBM: $109 billion, Google: $22 billion, Apple: $33 billion

Forecast FY2008 profit (excluding special items)
IBM: $12.2 billion, Google: $6.3 billion, Apple: $4.7 billion

Share price rise/fall in the year to date
IBM: +16 percent, Google: -28 percent, Apple: -9 percent

Forward price/earnings multiple
IBM: 14 times, Google: 25 times, Apple: 34 times

In case you’re wondering when any of them might catch up with the world’s largest tech company, they’ve got a ways to go yet. While Microsoft may lag Google on the Web market, the software maker’s shares are worth $255 billion.

(Photo: Eamon Sullivan of Australia (C) swims to a world record next to Pieter van den Hoogenband (R) of the Netherlands and Brent Hayden (L) of Canada in their men’s 100 meters freestyle semi-final at the National Aquatics Center during the Beijing 2008 Olympics August 13, 2008. REUTERS/Wolfgang Rattay)

Comments
One comment so far | RSS Comments RSS

these facts and figures are pretty suggestive in themselves that Apple Inc. is up about here vying for the number one spot if not immediately, surely in the near future… With the kind of innovative products that Apple has been giving it is only fair to predict a future as so… Apple Inc deserves the spot if anyone does at all…

 

Post Your Comment

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/