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Getting ready for Google Explorer aka Chrome

September 2, 2008

googlechromepic.jpgGoogle is getting into the browser business with the launch of Google Chrome, a browser designed for today’s Internet user with better capabilities for video and other complex Web programs.

The comic strip on the left walks news users through the Open Source browser project and can be found here.

Many commentators see this as a challenge to Microsoft which launched Internet Explorer 8 last week. IE is on 70 percent of most U.S. personal computers but is vulnerable to new challengers. Not to long ago it had close to 90 percent of the market but in recent years Mozilla’s Firefox browser and Apple’s Safari have eaten into that share.

 So why does Google need to launch a browser and what does it bring to the party?

This is what Google says:

We realized that the web had evolved from mainly simple text pages to rich, interactive applications and that we needed to completely rethink the browser. What we really needed was not just a browser, but also a modern platform for web pages and applications, and that’s what we set out to build. On the surface, we designed a browser window that is streamlined and simple. To most people, it isn’t the browser that matters. It’s only a tool to run the important stuff – the pages, sites and applications that make up the web. Like the classic Google homepage, Google Chrome is clean and fast. It gets out of your way and gets you where you want to go.

This is what some bloggers say…

The software will be seamlessly integrated, and it will make Google’s (and other) online apps, games, etc. richer and simpler to use, especially if/when you’re offline. It will feature a Google search window (and, unlike Microsoft, Google won’t get in trouble when it sets the default to Google). It will be capable of running directly on any device without Windows. Unlike Windows, it will be free. And it will come pre-loaded–just like Windows–because who really wants to bother with downloading.

– Henry Blodget, Silicon Alley Insider

Google’s in no danger of foundering, given its search business still dominates and quite profitably, of course. But, for all the halo of that, Google has also never had any other similar true home run with any of the other products it has released so far. And to portray Chrome as a Windows killer-which some are quite incorrectly doing-is not the kind of image Google should encourage.  Nonetheless, with this move, the search giant has certainly stepped into the spotlight more than it ever has (and this is a company that-let’s be honest-never misses a chance to frolic and show off in that spotlight).

– Kara Swisher, All Things Digital

Keep an eye on:

  • Google offers YouTube-like video-sharing for businesses as part of its suite of business applications. (Reuters)
  • Expensive advertising of prescription drugs directly to consumers may do little to encourage sales (Reuters)
  • A price war for high-speed Internet service is heating up between phone and cable companies (WSJ)
Comments
6 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

looking forward to Chrome for efficiency’s sake… plus Google tends to roll out really well-tested software, so it shouldn’t be half bad in any case

 

It is great to knnow that the worlds best search engine is designing a new explorer to go one step further in assisting its fans.And I feel it will give a very tough compitition to Mocrosoft which has momopoly in most of the softwares. Looking forward to useyour explorer.
Regards
Jashandeep
Lecturer:- BGIMT Sangrur

Posted by Jashandeep Singh | Report as abusive
 

google new explorer is welcome on the net. its fast & much smoother.

 

good

Posted by m akram | Report as abusive
 

Thank you for your’s kindly

Posted by wa3947 | Report as abusive
 

sagar ke do kinare hote hai kuch log jan se bhi pyare hote hain ye jarori nahi ki har koi pass hi ho zindagi main yadon ke bhi share hote hain

 

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