More talks between Yahoo and AOL? Why not?

September 24, 2008

yahoo2.jpgHere we go again… It seems that Yahoo’s new board has given the thumbs up to a new round of talks about Time Warner’s AOL, according to a report in the Financial Times

The newspaper says that the board’s move potentially reignites “negotiations for a combination of the two internet businesses that stalled earlier this year.”

According to one person familiar with the company’s thinking, the Yahoo board approved a new round of discussions with AOL, though active deal negotiations are not underway at this stage.

Recall, just last week that Time Warner honcho Jeff Bewkes said that there would be some plan for AOL “fairly soon” — even as he acknowledged that the industry still hadn’t come to a conclusion on what sort of business model worked best.

As Silicon Alley Insider points out, it’s hard to imagine AOL hasn’t been sniffing around before now.

If that’s really all that got discussed, then we have to say that Carl (Icahn) is right: It really isn’t worth getting on a plane to attend these things. Because AOL has already been talking to Yahoo and Microsoft (and anyone else it can think) about a deal.

Keep an eye on:

  • Ford is running an ad featuring a short film that won an online competition, promoting Ford’s new 2010 Mustang (Reuters)
  • New York’s financial journalists are already gearing up for books on Wall Street’s financial crisis (The New York Observer)
  • PepsiCo is offering $1 million to anyone who can create a Super Bowl commercial for its Doritos tortilla chip brand that trumps all other ads in viewer rankings (WSJ.com)
  • Discovery Communications will create nine branded channels on the YouTube video website, featuring clips from the cable programmer’s top TV shows, its chief executive said (Reuters)

(Photo: Reuters)

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