MediaFile

Steve Jobs jokes about health (again)

October 14, 2008

Steve JobsAfter joking last month about reports of his death, Apple CEO Steve Jobs is poking fun again at the endless speculation over the state of his health.

At a Tuesday event to unveil new MacBook laptop computers, Jobs stood in front of a big screen that said his blood pressure was 110/70, quipping, “And that’s all we’re going to be talking about – Steve’s health today.”

(In case anyone’s wondering, blood pressure under 120/80 is considered normal)

Remember a month ago at Apple’s 3G iPhone launch, Jobs had stood in front of another big screen that said “The reports of my death are greatly exaggerated.

(Photo: REUTERS/Kimberly White)

Comments
3 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

Long-live Steve!

Posted by Nafie | Report as abusive
 

People,

you should all know that pancreatic cancer is a death sentence. The only cure for it is death unfortunately. I know, I lost my mom to it and have read everything known to man about the disease. It is very aggressive and metasticizes to the liver very commonly…It’s only a matter of time!!

Posted by Nigel Petersham | Report as abusive
 

@Nigel Petersham
It turns out that Steve had an “islet cell neuroendocrine tumor” which is far more rare (5%) and far more treatable (90%) than the more common form of pancreatic cancer, adenocarcinoma. Apple have not released the kind of surgery he had, but the typical procedure is called Whipple, which removes the duodenum, at least part of the pancreas and sometimes part of the stomach. That he’s thinner now is hardly a surprise and does not necessarily bode ill for his longevity.

Posted by Popa Woody | Report as abusive
 

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