Sprint: Android not good enough yet

October 24, 2008

Sprint may be having a lot of problems marketing its own brand in the last few years, but according to Chief Executive Dan Hesse, Google’s Android mobile operating system isn’t perfect either.

He told the National Press Club in Washington that he didn’t think Android in its current form is ”good enough to put the Sprint brand on it.”

But Hesse promised to sell a phone powered by Android “at some time in the future.” Sprint is part of the alliance of about 30 companies that said they would support Google’s development of a mobile phone operating system. T-Mobile USA started selling the first phone powered by Android earlier this week.  (Reporting by Kim Dixon)

(Photograph: Reuters)

19 comments

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This is a mistake.

Sprint needs android terribly.

The software on my phone drives me nuts.

I have stayed on sprint only with the hope of an android phone in the near future.

Posted by Kurt | Report as abusive

Hesse is right on with this. I had the opportunity to check out the G1 and the software has a lot of potential, but is not quite ready for prime time yet.

That being said, I think it will evolve quickly and Sprint will release an Android flavored handset some time on the first half of ’09.

Posted by Brian | Report as abusive

[...] Michael Oryl • October 25, 2008 According to Reuters, Sprint’s CEO Dan Hesse (the guy in those black and white commercials) told the National [...]

[...] during commercial breaks during Heroes? That’s Old Man Hesse, up Sprint way, who has him a bone to pick with Android. Sprint may be having a lot of problems marketing its own brand in the last few years, but [...]

Dan Hesse is exactly right. Android isn’t even at a 1.0 quality.

Posted by Robert Hicks | Report as abusive

But he’s right, it’s incomplete, and the worst thing he could do is disappoint customers by hyping and selling a product that’s only half-baked. Once it’s done, he sez he’ll sell them.

What’s the problem? Not buying into the hype is a crime? Or selling a high-end, does-everything phone without (say) Bluetooth?

Posted by wpns | Report as abusive

[...] the mobile realm since the advent of the iPhone is, um, questionable at best.[Via Android Authority]Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments – | del.icio.us || Digg it || [...]

[...] Read­&n­b­sp;|&n­b­sp;Pe­rmalink­&n­­b­s p;|&n­­b­sp;E­m­ail t­his&n­bsp;|&n­bsp;Co­mme­n­t­s [...]

[...] the mobile realm since the advent of the iPhone is, um, questionable at best.[Via Android Authority]Read | Permalink | Email [...]

[...] the mobile realm since the advent of the iPhone is, um, questionable at best.[Via Android Authority]Read | Permalink | Email [...]

[...] the mobile realm since the advent of the iPhone is, um, questionable at best.[Via Android Authority]Read | Permalink | Email [...]

[...] the mobile realm since the advent of the iPhone is, um, questionable at best.[Via Android Authority]Read | Permalink | Email [...]

[...] the mobile realm since the advent of the iPhone is, um, questionable at best.[Via Android Authority]Read | Permalink | Email [...]

I agree that it is probably not ready yet. If i purchase a phone from sprint with TV, GPS and Internet i want it to work right. I have played with the rom and it looks like theres work to be done.

Posted by Darrin | Report as abusive

[...] the mobile realm since the advent of the iPhone is, um, questionable at best.[Via Android Authority]Read | Permalink | Email [...]

[...] MediaFile » Blog Archive » Sprint: Android not good enough yet | Blogs |Dear Sprint, get a clue, and put out an Android Phone. [...]

Sprint is running around in circles. They should close the stores and reinvest those savings in a business unit that provides services (OTA provisioning, billing, CDN, etc.) directly to software developers.

Posted by scott | Report as abusive

[...] a lossy network at #3 might have something to do with it. According to Sinead Carew of Reuters, Hesse was quoted as telling the National Press Club that the Android open source operating system [...]

[...] Sprint: Android not good enough yet [Reuters] [...]

[...] a lossy network at #3 might have something to do with it. According to Sinead Carew of Reuters, Hesse was quoted as telling the National Press Club that the Android open source operating system [...]

Sprint doesn’t like the openness. They want more control over what VOIP, IM peole are doing, which is like totally disrupting Sprint’s whole business model.

Sprint doesn’t like the total openness in applications you can install. Such as Amazon Mp3 store and stuff like that, which has no guarantee to share revenues with Sprint, and treating Sprint as just a dumb pipe.

Sprint is just afraid of the data centric revolution.

It will be a real success if it can open, with no hickups, most or common video formats just like being online on a regular PC. I am hoping the 2nd generation will have this capability. If it can view C-SPAN it will be a big plus too.

Posted by Spencer | Report as abusive

Not good enough for what? It’s better than Windows Mobile. It’s certainly a lot nicer than running J2ME apps on some random Sony Ericsson or Motorola. Am I missing something?

Posted by exapted | Report as abusive

[...] Reuters] if (!window.netshel_ord) { netshel_ord=Math.random()*10000000000000 000; } if [...]

Not good enough for Sprint… What was the razr???

Posted by glenn | Report as abusive

[...] Reuters, Thanks Kurt!] This entry was written by admin, posted on October 26, 2008 at 10:47 am, filed [...]

sorry the article actual quoted him wrong he actually said:

“Sprint isn’t good enough for the Google (Android) brand” sorry for the confusion everyone.

[...] Hesse, the CEO of Sprint, one of the founding members of the OHA, was quoted saying that Android still needs a bit of a finesse before it carries its logo. This comes at a time when everyone out there is pulling on Sprint for not being able to maintain [...]

[...] ricorda Reuters, è tra le 30 aziende che dichiarano di supportare lo sviluppo di un “sistema [...]

[...] imploding under the weight of a tough economy and defecting customers. Still, Sprint CEO Dan Hesse was recently quoted as saying that Google’s new Android OS “is not good enough to put the Sprint brand on it.” [...]

[...] imploding under the weight of a tough economy and defecting customers. Still, Sprint CEO Dan Hesse was recently quoted as saying that Google’s new Android OS “is not good enough to put the Sprint brand on it.” [...]

[...] imploding under the weight of a tough economy and defecting customers. Still, Sprint CEO Dan Hesse was recently quoted as saying that Google’s new Android OS “is not good enough to put the Sprint brand on it.” [...]

I just got a G1 phone this past Friday and let me tell you, it’s definitely a very powerful tool for those who are hard core Google apps users. The two most important tools I use from Google (Gmail and Calendar) integrate right into the phone. I think what some people don’t quite understand yet is how tight things work together. All my contacts in Gmail are contacts in the phone. Everything is so well organized and seamless as far as email+phone+IM+calendar, all the other features that exist I consider bonus. This phone does what it needs to, the other features such as video recording/playback, etc… will come in time, but lack thereof should not be a reason to say it can’t be sold to your customers.

If you’re looking for a phone/communications device then this phone is for you. If you’re looking for a media player that also has a phone in it, then you should consider an iPhone or wait for Android to mature.

[...] Hesse, the CEO of Sprint, one of the founding members of the OHA, was quoted saying that Android still needs a bit of a finesse before it carries its logo. This comes at a time when everyone out there is pulling on Sprint for not being able to maintain [...]

[...] Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments [...]

[...] Reuters Photo Source: flickr Share and [...]

[...] Reuters, Thanks Kurt!] Share and [...]

[...] to Reuters, Sprint CEO Dan Hesse told the National Press Club in Washington that he didn’t think Android in [...]

[...] solleverà qualche perplessità sulla maturità del codice del sistema operativo. Perplessità che hanno espresso anche alcuni pezzi grossi della Open Handset Alliance, e che complicano un po’ il cammino di [...]

[...] с этим, в блоге Reuters сообщается, что Sprint Nextel, третий по величине сотовый оператор в [...]

[...] Club event Mr. Hesse was quoted as saying that the Android open source operating system is not “good enough to put the Sprint brand on it.” Mission Accomplished: You are now [...]

[...] Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments No tag for this post. [...]

[...] limelight lately. But imagine the irony when I stumbled upon the following information, courtesy of Reuters: Apparently, Sprint CEO Dan Hesse doesn’t think Android in its current form is ”good enough [...]

Yeah, because Sprint has such an amazing line up of phones to pick from now, god forbid they actually released one that had some hint of promise.

Posted by Matthew | Report as abusive

[...] we don’t precisely know the context for Sprint Nextel CEO Dan Hesse’s speech, but according to Reuters, this guy, whom you may remember from those classy black-and-white commercials on the TV, has [...]

I don’t know why sprint is saying the Android is not good enough for it’s customers. I am a sprint customer and the last phone that I purchased from sprint was an upstage. If that phone was good enough for its customers then two paper cups and a string is good enough.

Posted by Donna | Report as abusive

[...] [Reuters] Android, dan hesse, sprint [...]

[...] Sprint CEO Dan Hesse says Android isn’t quite ready to carry the Sprint name on a device – not yet anyway. He says that Sprint will carry an Android [...]

[...] CEO Dan Hesse said that Sprint is not ready for the Google Android OS just yet. According to Reuters, Hesse said that at present Android is not “good enough to put the Sprint brand on [...]

Wait — you meant to tell me that a major operator doesn’t want a potentially competing service provider (Google) to disintermediate their customer relationships, especially with a half-baked platform that is already riddled with security flaws? Operators supporting Android need to be truly desperate or completely blind not to see the blatant business model conflict that Google has with their own long-term business objectives.

[...] Sprint CEO Dan Hesse says Android isn’t quite ready to carry the Sprint name on a device – not yet anyway. He says that Sprint will carry an Android [...]

[...] Read | Permalink | Email this | Comments Sphere: Related Content [...]

[...] il problema anche sulle altre piattaforme che includono G1. In contemporanea a tutto ciò si alzano le voci di chi ritiene il sistema di Google ancora troppo immaturo per essere diffuso presso il [...]

[...] textualmente que “Android no es lo suficientemente bueno como para poner la marca Sprint en un equipo con [...]

[...] Today Sprint offered the lineup for its upcoming mobile developer’s conference on Dec. 10-12, which will include a keynote by Rich Miner, Google’s vice president of mobile technology. While we’ve known thatSprint was considering Android, this fall Sprint CEO Dan Hesse apparently told a group of reporters in Washington that the Android platform wasn’t “good enough to put the Sprint brand on it.” [...]

[...] for a while now, and despite Sprint CEO Dan Hesse recently saying that Android wasn’t “good enough to put the Sprint brand on it” – he did assure people that Sprint were still planning on releasing an Android [...]

20, 2008 3:34 PM

Well Well Well, it’s nice to see others are having the same problems I’m having, ALMOST!! First off I was a NEXTEL customer for 6 years before SPRINT so called merged, I was well satisfied with my service, I was using a NEXTEL Air Card for internet access and was satisfied until about 6 months after the merger when SPRINT had NEXTEL lower the speed to get people to buy SPRINT air cards which I fell for. I bought a SPRINT air card which went out 32 days after I bought it after downloading Sprint’s updates (remember this for later) I got with the NEXTEL/SPRINT store where I bought the Sprint Air Card and they called customer service (I had already heard from friends who were SPRINT customers that told me not to use SPRINT because customer service is really bad, I also heard this on National TV, well kick my ass for not listening) The owner of the store was on the phone with Sprint customer service and could not get these people to send the replacement Air Card to her store due to the fact that I was living on a boat because my home and area was at the time under water due to Hurricane Katrina, SPRINT sent the replacement Aircard to my home address which was undeliverable and returned, The owner of the NEXTEL/SPRINT store called a week later and they already had the returned Aircard to try to get customer service to send the darn replacement to her store again, Nooooo SPRINT customer service sent it to my home address again!!! There was no home there, nobody could live there because everything was under water again from hurricane Rita!!! the Aircard was returned again!! the NEXTEL/SPRINT store owner again called customer service……ok you know the story 3 times customer service sent the Aircard to my home address after being told all 3 times that I was living on a boat near her store and my home was on National TV and was destroyed and no one was allowed to return due to the damage in the area. Finally after the 3rd Aircard was returned the sent the Aircard to her store which I was able to pickup. I had to pay all my bills online without seeing a bill due to the hurricane situation. When I finally was able to catch up with my mail (I give praise to the USPS for their determination thru the hurricane crisis) I opened my bill and SPRINT was charging for 2 aircard services!!! I HAD ONLY ONE AIRCARD!!!! now I could only get reimbursed for 2 month service after I had been paying for 5 months for 2 Aircards. I canceled the service. Next I get a bill for early termination of 2 Aircards!!! $400.00!!! I called customer service, I agreed I should be charged for early termination for one aircard but not 2, well this became another nightmare, I was talking to what seemed like people who could not understand what I was telling them due to they were probably still getting over the 40oz malt liquor they had the night before, my calls were being dropped. I finally called back the 4th time and got a young girl who I had to explain, hun, If you bought a car which in 32 days after you drove it off the lot the motor broke, the interior fell apart and the paint peeled off and they replaced the car, should you pay for 2 cars? WALLA!! She understood my story now. I only paid for 1 early termination and was reimbursed 2 months of the 5 months I paid. NOW kick my ass again, 1 year later I got another Aircard which after I downloaded SPRINTS updates my USB ports on my computer will not work, I called Customer Service and the nightmare has begun again, I canceled my service again and paid the early termination fee and canceled my NEXTEL phone which I’ve had for 8 years. I checked on SPRINTS stock it was $.74 a share, I purchased 53,265 shares because I know someone will take them over and my stock will be worth quite a bit more later. SPRINT service was very good but their customer service is like trying to deal with Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac. (you people who had the Fannie Mae & Freddie Mac loans know exactly what I’m talking about) I’m using Verizon Wireless services now and am happy, I had AT&T but they can’t compare with SPRINT and VERIZON on Mobile internet services.

Posted by Someone | Report as abusive

Well guys i work for sprint i agree all your comments here, dont worry sprint willing to replace all your suck equipments but the only problem is you have to call every day for follow up.

Posted by Joey S. Regis | Report as abusive

[...] Samsung first announced its Android plans last year, after it was revealed that the company had formed a sizable team of Linux and Java experts to build an Android touchscreen phone reportedly similar to the company’s Omnia handset, which runs Windows Mobile. The products suffered some delays and it became unclear whether Samsung would still deliver an Android phone on Sprint’s network when Sprint backed away from Android. [...]

[...] Samsung first announced its Android plans last year, after it was revealed that the company had formed a sizable team of Linux and Java experts to build an Android touchscreen phone reportedly similar to the company’s Omnia handset, which runs Windows Mobile. The products suffered some delays and it became unclear whether Samsung would still deliver an Android phone on Sprint’s network when Sprint backed away from Android. [...]

[...] Samsung first announced its Android plans last year, after it was revealed that the company had formed a sizable team of Linux and Java experts to build an Android touchscreen phone reportedly similar to the company’s Omnia handset, which runs Windows Mobile. The products suffered some delays and it became unclear whether Samsung would still deliver an Android phone on Sprint’s network when Sprint backed away from Android. [...]

[...] Samsung first announced its Android plans last year, after it was revealed that the company had formed a sizable team of Linux and Java experts to build an Android touchscreen phone reportedly similar to the company’s Omnia handset, which runs Windows Mobile. The products suffered some delays and it became unclear whether Samsung would still deliver an Android phone on Sprint’s network when Sprint backed away from Android. [...]

[...] Samsung first announced its Android plans last year, after it was revealed that the company had formed a sizable team of Linux and Java experts to build an Android touchscreen phone reportedly similar to the company’s Omnia handset, which runs Windows Mobile. The products suffered some delays and it became unclear whether Samsung would still deliver an Android phone on Sprint’s network when Sprint backed away from Android. [...]

[...] Samsung first announced its Android plans last year, after it was revealed that the company had formed a sizable team of Linux and Java experts to build an Android touchscreen phone reportedly similar to the company’s Omnia handset, which runs Windows Mobile. The products suffered some delays and it became unclear whether Samsung would still deliver an Android phone on Sprint’s network when Sprint backed away from Android. [...]

[...] Samsung впервые озвучила свои планы на Android в прошлом году, когда было объявлено о создании команды Linux- и Java-экспертов для создания сенсорного телефона с Android, согласно сообщениям, аналогичному выпускаемому компанией аппарату Omnia с Windows Mobile. С выпуском продукта произошли некоторые задержки, когда стало неясно, будет ли Samsung поставлять телефоны для сети Sprint после того, как Sprint пока отказалась работать с Android. [...]

[...] Samsung first announced its Android plans last year, after it was revealed that the company had formed a sizable team of Linux and Java experts to build an Android touchscreen phone reportedly similar to the company’s Omnia handset, which runs Windows Mobile. The products suffered some delays and it became unclear whether Samsung would still deliver an Android phone on Sprint’s network when Sprint backed away from Android. [...]

I have been with Sprint 6 years and have no major complaints with them in the past. They are quickly falling behind though and I am seriously thinking of switching to T-Mobile simply for the G-1. Dan’s continued delay in pushing subpar phones confuses me. When calling customer service, they are clueless, only pushing the Palm Pre. How can they say they are part of the Open Handset Alliance if customer service has no clue? Cricket and Metro even look better after you learn that Boost only supports their own phones, not even supporting Nextel phones fully.

Posted by mojo | Report as abusive

so is it andorid’s fault or samsung’s?

Posted by tariqjamil | Report as abusive