MediaFile

WSJ=Way Smarter Journalists

November 10, 2008

News Corp is realizing synergies, cross-promoting among its brands. Here’s the latest announcement:

NEW YORK (Nov. 10, 2008) – HarperCollins Publishers and The Wall Street Journal today announced the formation of a three-year publishing partnership to develop books written by the Journal’s expert editors and reporters across a variety of topics for a wide range of readers. Both HarperCollins and Dow Jones & Company, which publishes The Wall Street Journal, are owned by News Corp. The program will be overseen by Steve Ross, group president of the Collins Group, a division of Harper Collins, and Alan Murray, deputy managing editor at The Wall Street Journal, in conjunction with the Publishers and editorial teams from the Collins, Collins Business, Collins Living and Collins Design imprints.

That’s all fine, if a bit humdrum. You have to dig down past the usual canned quotes in the press release to get to the good stuff, which as always emanates from the pen of Wall Street Journal Managing Editor Robert Thomson:

“We needed to find the world’s pre-eminent publisher and, fortunately, that publisher was very close to home,” said Robert Thomson, managing editor of The Wall Street Journal and editor-in-chief of Dow Jones. “The demand for intelligent and insightful books on business and beyond has rarely been greater, and there is no doubt that the journalists at the Journal and Dow Jones generally are far more intelligent and measurably more insightful than journalists at other newspapers.” (emphasis ours.)

The first title, “The Wall Street Journal Guide to the End of Wall Street As We Know It: What You Need to Know About the Greatest Financial Crisis of Our Time – And How to Survive It,” is by former Journal editor Dave Kansas — now employed at a joint personal finance site run by Dow Jones and Barry Diller’s IAC/InterActiveCorp. 

(Photo: Reuters)

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