MediaFile

Move over Mom, Lifetime’s got game

November 10, 2008

When the going gets tough, the tough play dress up.

Women-focused cable channel Lifetime Network on Monday expanded its push into gaming by buying Korean casual gaming site, Roiworld.com, the No. 1 teen dress up site in Korea.

Terms were undisclosed, but the company says its move to tap into the female gaming audience, particularly where they use avatars to dress up,  is paying big and younger dividends.

While Lifetime’s traditional TV audience has tended  to skew to more mature women,  the network is trying to broaden its audience to include more younger viewers and its Web dress-up properties are drawing women, largely aged 30 and below. Roiworld.com will bring more than 1,000 additional fashion and style games to the Lifetime Games portfolio, which it claims is a  top 25 online destination among casual gaming sites.

The ”Dress Up” category lets users dress up an avatar, combining user-generated content, social networking and virtual world experiences through fashion. The new Roiworld.com is currently set to launch in the U.S. in early 2009.  The Korean version of Roiworld.com had 2.8 million monthly unique visitors and 117 million monthly page views during the month of September.

With the popularity of the Nintendo Wii console and DS handheld system, game publishers are also turning their attention to girls, with the holidays promising to feature a heavy lineup of games for girls. Some of the biggest include THQ’s “All Star Cheer Squad”, Electronic Arts’ “Littlest Pet Shop”, Disney Interactive’s “High School Musical 3″ and Ubisoft’s “Imagine” series. Womens’ TV and gaming also intersected last week when game publisher Electronic Arts appointed Geraldine Laybourne, founder of womens network Oxygen Media, to its board of directors.

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