MediaFile

Video games defy economic gloom

December 12, 2008

U.S. shoppers are still spending in a big way — they are just not buying cars, plane tickets, clothing, etc. But they are buying video games.

While most media segments try to maintain stability during today’s economic turmoil, the video game industry keeps on growing, with U.S. video game hardware and software sales up 10 percent last month according to NPD, fueled by record sales of Nintendo’s Wii console and DS hand-held system.

Nintendo’s Wii console sold over 2 million units in November, up from over 800,000 in the previous month.

A separate reports suggests that hard times may favor video games, adults will “turn to
staying in with video games rather than going out on the spend.”

(Reuters)

Keep an eye on:

  • DreamWorks Animation launches characters like Shrek and the penguins from “Madagascar” into new lines of business, hoping to grow consistently even during a recession that already is slowing DVD sales. (Los Angeles Times)
  • Time Warner names CEO Jeff Bewkes as chairman; Richard Parsons to step down on Dec. 31 (PaidContent)
  • CBS Interactive reorganization details (PaidContent)
  • Howard Stern contemplates re-signing with Sirius XM (Orbitcast)

(Photo: Reuters)

Comments
13 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

If someone wants to acquire enjoyments suddenly-video game would be the best resort-to remain involved deeply-without thinking or looking at the world.An escappist can take much interests of this to be involved in creartive works.

 

$60 for a top video game is alot but if you spend months playing it, well it saves you money from doing other things – like going to the mall!

Steven
http://TopVideoGames.com

 

I know every game I buy in Australia costs in excess of $90. The biggest question is when are you clowns going to stop charging us for a piece of code which should be free.

Posted by Trooy | Report as abusive
 

Why should video games be free? Companies spend millions of dollars to develop and market these games. To expect them to be free is naive. Just because the product is not tangible like a car or pizza does not diminish the intrinsic value of it. It’s worth the price if you are entertained by it.

 

Aggree for paying games but how much ? Depending of the quality and time spent for development ( consider also those who are earning and living withen that segment ) I am just confused , that market is still growing where we have global crises and people have still enough money to pay.

 

The biggest question is when are you clowns going to stop charging us for a piece of code which should be free.

 

Who will work for free actually? Me myself not. for sure they will charge money against their efforts and spent time. My only wish is that this amount should be reasonable.

 

Nintendo’s Wii console sold over 2 million units in November, up from over 800,000 in the previous month.

its perfect.

 

Why should video games be free? Companies spend millions of dollars to develop and market these games

 

I am just confused , that market is still growing where we have global crises and people have still enough money to pay.

 

Televizyon, the economy is troubled, but most people still have jobs and disposable income. The video game industry would say that people are buying consoles for $300 or $400, and games for $60 and less, rather than taking a vacation for $1,000s, etc.

 

omg.. who’ll sell you their work for free !!?? lols..
they spend every ounce of their knowledge to create a beautiful piece of work, to entertain you.. and you want it for free?? lols..
video games

Posted by john | Report as abusive
 

Who will work for free actually? Me myself not. for sure they will charge money against their efforts and spent time.

 

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