MediaFile

CES: Is Sony’s new Vaio a netbook?

January 8, 2009

In the old days -– say six months ago -– netbooks were easy to describe in a few short words. Cheap (less than $400), small (10-inch screen or less) and light (less than 3 pounds). Alas, things are not quite so simple anymore.

The netbook category’s parameters were already expanding as the market flooded with new offerings. Screen sizes crept up, as did retail prices.

And then along comes Sony to really confuse things with its Vaio P Series Lifestyle PC, which it unveiled at the Consumer Electronics Show. It’s plenty small (8-inch screen) and light (1.4 pounds). But note that decidedly un-netbook-like price tag: $900.

Of course, the company itself is not calling it a netbook either, although plenty of others are. And the impressive array of high-performance bells and whistles Sony packed into the little laptop might well justify the hefty price tag, and succeed in separating it from its similarly small, yet more stripped-down and lower-market peers.

So call it what you want, netbook or mini notebook or something else entirely. The Vaio P is simply the latest evidence that ultra-portable computers, though they may be small, are succeeding in redefining the PC world.

Comments
4 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

what does this do that the asus eee pc doesn’t do for only $299.00?

Posted by joe plap | Report as abusive
 

I think Reuters has made a small error; this is not news, this is an advertisement.

Posted by Jack | Report as abusive
 

In answer to the whats does it do that the eeepc doesnt thats easy it has the words SONY on it.

 

@joe: Why don’t you, I don’t know, read up on the specs and decide for yourself?

The answer is exactly what you’d expect: it has a faster cpu (1.33 vs .9), more ram (2G/512K), larger hard drive (60G/16G+4G), and is Vista capable. Heck, it even comes with Vista Home Basic.

Yeah, it still sounds like a Netbook. But it is definitely a better computer all around. Remember, it’s running an Atom processor, which is about equal to half a real one.

Posted by trkly | Report as abusive
 

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