Twitter older than it looks

March 30, 2009

You could be forgiven for thinking Twitter was the latest example of youth culture.

From the ability to fire off grammatically-abbreviated updates about daily trifles to keeping tabs on celebrities, the fast-growing microblogging service has all the earmarks of a young person’s pastime.

But Twitter devotees are grayer than one might expect: The majority of Twitter’s roughly 10 million unique Web site visitors worldwide in February were 35 years old or older, according to comScore.

In the U.S, 10 percent of Twitter users were between 55 and 64, nearly the same amount of users as those between 18 and 24, which accounted for 10.6 percent of the total.

Twitter has seen its popularity explode in recent months, with the number of unique visitors to its site increasing by more than 1000 percent year-over-year in February, according to comScore.

Social media Web sites like MySpace and Facebook have also experienced an increase in older users recently. But the parade of elders came after younger users drove the initial surge in popularity (in Facebook’s case, of course, the service was initially limited to college students).

Twitter is a rare example of older people embracing a new Web technology at such an early stage, says Andrew Lipsman, director of industry analysis at comScore.

He posits that the knowledge to understand and use a service like Twitter is no longer confined to youngsters as a greater portion of the population has gotten older using the Internet in the past 15 years.

And he notes that social media services like Twitter and Facebook are becoming more and more entwined with business.

Twitter may even be catching on among people who have a reached a post-business phase of their lives: Of the 4 million U.S. Twitter users in February, 5.2 percent were 65 or older.

6 comments

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[...] original post here: MediaFile » Blog Archive » Twitter older than it looks | Blogs | Posted in Articles, Object, Uncategorized, Videos | Tags: demographics, entertainment, [...]

Maybe, because twitter requires exposition of a cogent idea in <140 characters, it defeats some of the younger, ‘post-literate’ generation?

Lock presumes that, whether made by older or younger people, twitter comments are cogent. Disagree.

Posted by grapejam | Report as abusive

[...] – Linked In – A professional social network, Linked In is probably one of the best sources of information for head hunters to find their targets. It’s like an online résumé. But what Linked In lacks (or simply users don’t use it to that purpose) is information regarding the involvement of the target with the type of job he has. Is he a simple Joe who just does his 8 hours of work and doesn’t do much more or is he this information powerhouse that would be valuable for the company? Simple – if this person has a Twitter account, you can check just the type of information he shares and is interested in simply by following him and checking who he is following. Sure, you can always say that the Linked In target is not exactly Twitter’s target, but consider that most Twitter users are professional above 35 years-old. [...]

[...] Onliner, Social Media, Twitter, Web Twitter not only gets more attention: Its users are a lot older than many suspected says comScore; http://tr.im/iqj0   [...]

[...] is an old persons thing – according to Alexei Oreskovic from Reuters. He found that the most active age group on Twitter is 45-54 which makes sense to me [...]

[...] a post by Reuters reporter Alexei Oreskovic, comScore says that users aged between 25-54 are driving the growth trend. […] 18-24 year olds, [...]

[...] reporter Alexei Oreskovic plots age groups, specifically the 25-54 year old group that is driving the trend. TweetDeck is [...]

[...] A Reuters blog post takes a look at this pattern and discusses the move toward older demographics using social media in general more. [...]

[...] continues to have incredible growth but it may surprise you where the growth is coming from.  Alexei Oreskovic shared these great nuggets of information regarding Twitter in a recent post for Reuter’s [...]

Don’t make your Twitter feed just another one-way convo…

A sure sign that a fad or trend is going mainstream is that how-to conferences start to spring up. I just got a notice of a Twitter conference. Here’s the PR blast highlights: TWTRCON SF 09 INITIAL SPEAKER LINE-UP INCLUDES……

[...] was nothing more than the latest social media fad for gum chewing 15-year olds.  That is until Reuters’ Alexei Oreskovic did the research and came up with this bombshell: The majority of Twitter’s roughly 10 million [...]

[...] a post by Reuters reporter Alexei Oreskovic, comScore says that users aged between 25-54 are driving the growth trend. […] 18-24 year olds, [...]

[...] MediaFile » Blog Archive » Twitter older than it looks | Blogs | (tags: twitter reuters) [...]

[...] was nothing more than the latest social media fad for gum chewing 15-year olds.  That is until Reuters’ Alexei Oreskovic did the research and came up with this bombshell: The majority of Twitter’s roughly 10 million [...]

I think this is important and have been pointing it out for a few weeks. Quantcast’s numbers are even starker. The fact is, the kids are *not* using Twitter.

Posted by pwb | Report as abusive

[...] is amazing. Some reports suggest more than 10 million users are now signed on to Twitter and the the majority of them are 35 years and [...]

[...] visits to Twitter approached 10 million in February,” Reuters published an article (‘Twitter Older Than It Looks’) which reveals just how much it’s being embraced by [...]

[...] Twitter older than it looks [...]

[...] interesting observation has been reported by Reuter’s reporter Alexei Oreskovic. In his recent post he has analyzed the demographics of Twitter traffic. It was observed that [...]

[...] to Reuters blogger Alexei Oreskovic, while Twitter “has the fast-growing microblogging service has all the earmarks of a young [...]

[...] February alone, Twitter drew in almost 10 million visitors worldwide according to ComScore.  Reuters Blog speaks about the 25-54 year old crowd that is actually driving this trend. More specifically, [...]

[...] The following chart is from Comscore.com, and they got the stats from Reuters, Twitter Older than it Looks. [...]

This is interesting, but I think focusing on just the age of Twitter users is missing the larger point.

I think education level and professional status are far greater indicators of adoption level than just age. I’ve wrote more about this on my blog.

http://digg.com/u1ovc

[...] أشارت إلى مقالة كتبها “أليكس أوريزكوفك” الذي يعمل في وكالة “رويترز” ، بين فيها أنه لاحظ [...]

[...] reporter Alexei Oreskovic recently authored an interesting blog post about the demographics of Twitter users. What he discovered was that 18-24 year olds, the [...]

[...] continues to have incredible growth but may surprise you where the growth is coming from.  Alexei Oreskovic  shared these great nuggets of information regarding Twitter in a recent post for Reuter’s [...]

[...] to Reuters blogger Alexei Oreskovic, while Twitter “has the fast-growing microblogging service has all the earmarks of a young [...]

[...] Twitter older than it looks — Reuters [...]

[...] most surprising about Twitter is the discovery of its user profile. According to Reuters reporter, Alexei Oreskovic, 18-24 year olds, the traditional social media early adopters, are actually 12 percent less likely [...]

[...] later in the article when it says that 54-64 year olds are more likely to visit Twitter than 18-24 year olds and you sit [...]

[...] friends from the Middle East. Initially I put the minimal overlap down to a generational divide but recent reports indicate that older users have been driving much of the network’s recent growth. Anecdotally this [...]

[...] reporter Alexei Oreskovic recently authored an interesting blog post about the demographics of Twitter users. What he discovered was that 18-24 year olds, the [...]

[...] comScore, basato su uno studio Reuters, mostra la suddivisione degli utenti di Twitter per età negli Stati [...]

[...] MediaFile » Blog Archive » Twitter older than it looks | Blogs | [...]

[...] grabbed the grey market. You’d think the service would be swarming with 18-24 year olds. No. They’re much less likely to visit Twitter than the 45-54 year old demographic. 18-24s index at 88 and 45-54s index at 136. The figures are for the US but will surely apply sooner [...]

[...] of popular social media websites such as Facebook and MySpace.    However, the latest surveys here and here show that the Generation X (people born between 1964 to 1979) crowd were the ones driving [...]

[...] 45-54 Year Olds Most Likely to Twitter? Reuters [...]

[...] a post by Reuters reporter Alexei Oreskovic, comScore says that users aged between 25-54 are driving the growth trend. […] 18-24 year olds, [...]

[...] now we know everyone’s doing it: celebrities, companies, politicians, the older generation, and lowly old you and me are flocking to microblogging site Twitter in droves. But the rabbit hole [...]

[...] Traffic Spiked by 45-54 year olds The majority of Twitter’s roughly 10 million unique Web site visitors worldwide in February were 35 years old or o…, according to comScore from an article called Twitter Older than it Looks by Alexei Oreskovic [...]

[...] we don’t have to worry about dying of starvation and most Twitterers are safely post-celibate, all we have to live for now is that nanosecond of deference from strangers, which is why so many [...]

[...] media services like Twitter and Facebook are becoming more and more entwined with business.” (Read more…) Regarding the latter in the quotation, that is absolutely no light statement into a vacuum. [...]

[...] site, is amazing. Some reports suggest more than 10 million users are now signed on to Twitter and the majority of them are 35 years and [...]

I (am 59) find that Twitter is best used to follow a topic of interest. I have a different Twitter login for each topic that I am interested in and that keeps me up with the latest news on that topic.
It is also a useful news source, like when the Tsunami threatened our east coast of Australia.
..B..

имя,имени,человека,лю ей,руси,значение имени,женские имена,имена бесплатно,мужские имена,совместимость имен,имя человека,имена девочек,тайна имени,имена мальчиковУ каждого человека есть своё имя, но не каждый человек может сказать что
же значти его имя .
Не каждый знает происхождение и корни своего имени, хотя это очень важно.

[...] @IvyBean104 Oldest Twitter User? February 28, 2010 by Steve Stewart Ivy Bean made news recently as the oldest known Twitter user at 104 years old. Tech Crunch UK believes that Bean’s joining the microblogging site and tweeting was a public relations stunt by the computer maintenance company Geek Squad. Read more. Twitter is a rare example of older people embracing a new Web technology at such an early stage, says Andrew Lipsman, director of industry analysis at comScore. Read more. [...]

[...] reaching 14 million visitors, a large percentage of whom are between 25 and 54 years old, (seehttp://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2 009/03/30/twitter-older-than-it-looks/).     The odds are pretty good that some of those people are your clients or potential clients. [...]

[...] Twitter older than it looks | Analysis & Opinion | "The majority of Twitter’s roughly 10 million unique Web site visitors worldwide in February were 35 years old or older, according to comScore." (tags: twitter statistics) [...]

[...] lest you think it’s all about the youngsters, recent surveys show that Facebook and MySpace are full of gray hairs. This spring, Inside Facebook reported that [...]

[...] lest you think it’s all about the youngsters, recent surveys show that Facebook and MySpace are full of gray hairs. This spring, Inside Facebook reported that [...]