MediaFile

Newspaper Association cuts jobs, ditches print

April 30, 2009

I suppose that it’s natural that your representatives in Washington should be people who reflect their constituencies. In that spirit, there are reports out that the Newspaper Association of America — a tireless defender of print newspapers even as ad revenue crumbles all around them — is cutting the print edition of its magazine, along with half its jobs.

I’ve left messages with several NAA contacts, but in the meantime, We confirmed the news with the NAA — 39 jobs going away. Meanwhile, here is an excerpt from a report on AOL’s Daily Finance site:

The Newspaper Association of America (NAA) is the not-for-profit organization that represents the interests of over 2,000 newspapers and other print publications. Its roots can be traced back to 1887, and for many years its magazine Presstime has kept members up-to-date on trends in the marketplace. Therefore, it seems sadly ironic that the NAA is killing its print edition of Presstime. The magazine will now be available in an on-line version only.

It also links to this article from Editor & Publisher:

While its members struggle under a punishing economic downturn and a secular transition to digital, the Newspaper Association of America is cutting its staff by 50% and will cease publication of the print edition of the magazine Presstime.

The association trimmed 39 positions this afternoon in response to the downturn in the industry, with 43 staffers remaining. In a memo to employees, President and CEO John Sturm wrote the steps were necessary and were taken at the direction of the board. “To be direct, industry economics compelled this round of staff reductions – to ensure we remain an affordable value to our members,” he wrote.

Sturm also said the association is looking to further reduce member dues.

This really isn’t what I was hoping to tell you about this afternoon.

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