MediaFile

Chrysler: Coming soon to a TV near you

May 8, 2009

As the New York Times puts it this morning: “Even after receiving $15.4 billion in federal loans, General Motors is once again on the brink of financial collapse.” The reason is that the automaker burned through $10.2 billion in the firs quarter, while revenue dropped by almost half to $22.4 billion.

Does that mean GM is heading for bankruptcy? Possibly. Does that mean more bad news for the advertising industry, which has been hard hit by the pullback in spending from automakers? Not necessarily.

Take, for instance, the case of Chrysler. Adweek reports that the company, after filing for bankruptcy protection, is launching a new ad campaign that will debut on May 11 during prime-time television.

The initiative crafted by Omnicom Group’s BBDO in Detroit is designed to remind consumers that the automaker is still open for business, while highlighting the range of current and future vehicles in Chrysler’s portfolio and touting its rebirth as a global car company per its alliance with Fiat of Italy.

“When we asked consumers what they wanted to know about Chrysler, they told us to tell them about our products, tell them why they should buy our vehicles and give them a reason why they should be confident in the future of this company,” said Steven Landry, the company’s evp, North American sales, marketing, motor parts and service. “We believe this campaign delivers on all of those objectives. In addition, this campaign gives us the opportunity to reinforce that it’s business as usual and demonstrate a bright future ahead for Chrysler.”

As for GM, this is what Interpublic Chief Executive Michael Roth had to say about that situation during a conference call. (General Motors is a top client for IPG).

We can’t comment on what happens when you go through bankruptcy. There is a lot of flexibility in bankruptcy in terms of who gets paid, when they get paid, and what amount… Again I don’t mean to speculate, but once all this clears through and General Motors gets through whatever the process is going to be, there is going to be a demand to market automobiles. and we are well positioned to continue our partnership with General Motors. And going forward, we would expect to continue that relationship.

Keep an eye on:

  • Cablevision is at it again. This time company management is talking about spinning off its Madison Square Garden business (Reuters)
  • Eric Schmidt isn’t about to step down from Apple’s board, thank you very much (Reuters)
  • Viacom executives are in for a wild ride this weekend, as Paramount’s “Star Trek” hits the theaters with huge expectations (Reuters)

(Photo: Reuters)

Comments
2 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

The problem with the Auto Industry is NOT “being green”… ask Toyota about all of those Prius’ that are clogging its dealer’s lots… it has zero to do with quality… no, the primary problem is quite simply, “Bob and Betty” are NOT going to set foot in any showroom when they don’t even know if they will own a garage to park it in next week … It’s the foreclosures stupid… it’s the foreclosures…

S&P Case Shiller, Moody’s and Commerce, are off by a factor approaching 100%; there are not 11-12 million, but closer to 25 million homes in trouble. Nothing can or will happen to truly improve the economy and ease the plight of Detroit until the foreclosure and housing crisis is properly addressed. To date it has not… i.e. The current Fannie Mae guidelines make it virtually impossible for any self-employed person to qualify for financing… despite the advertised “kinder-gentler” loan modification programs supposedly being offered, a homeowner is still being required to be no less than 60 days delinquent prior to seeking any relief… that equates to a 150-180 point hit to a person’s credit scores… which new car do you think that you are going to buy with a 550 FICO score!

Congress cannot see the forest because of the trees…

 

Its sure going to be an AMERICAN made car and thats the bottom line cause STONE COLD said so.

Posted by Jerry Mayhew | Report as abusive
 

Post Your Comment

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/