MediaFile

Google makes a TV ad

May 8, 2009

Google built its business on the advertising shift from traditional media, like TV and newspapers, to the Internet.

But as Google strives to jump-start its fledgling Chrome Web browser, the company apparently still sees value in good old-fashioned mediums like broadcast television.

Google said it would begin advertising Chrome on various TV networks beginning this weekend.

The TV spot will raise awareness of its browser, Google explained in a posting on its blog on Friday, “and also help us better understand how television can supplement our other online media campaigns.”

The Chrome browser, which Google released last year, is a distant No.4 among Web browsers with a scant 1.4 percent market share in April, according to Net Applications. Microsoft’s Internet Explorer rules the roost with a 66.1 percent share, followed by the Firefox browser and Apple’s Safari browser, respectively.

The Chrome TV ad, which Google said was made by a team of its employees in Japan, is a whimsical stop-motion-like animation in which the Chrome logo bounces around a box of woodblocks.

The 30-second ad, which has music but no spoken words, finishes with the simple message “Install Google Chrome.”

Hulu, the online video site, saw its traffic surge following its Super Bowl TV ads earlier this year. The Google ads may not be as high profile, but the company no doubt hopes a little old-fashioned air time will make Chrome shine.

Comments
2 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

. . . “MEDIUMS” ???

Ow, I sprained my eyes rolling them.

Posted by Kurt Larson | Report as abusive
 

I didn’t get it. Stick to an ad on http://www.google.com. That I got and installed it.

Posted by Macovitch McGoogle | Report as abusive
 

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