MediaFile

Help a starving business reporter

May 19, 2009

They moved your markets. Now you can move their bank accounts.

The Society of American Business Editors and Writers, or SABEW, is hosting an event next week at Columbia University’s School of Journalism to help business journalists who have lost their jobs or found themselves in other tough straits because of the biggest story on every business reporter’s beat — the financial crisis. Here is the text of the invitation:

Former Wall Street Journal Managing Editor and ProPublica founder Paul Steiger, and New York Times Business Editor Larry Ingrassia invite you to join them at an event to benefit business journalism and the Society of American Business Editors and Writers (SABEW).

SABEW needs your support to help displaced business journalists and train business journalists for the digital age and new media landscape. Among SABEW’s programs are a revamped job listing site, a market for freelancers to find work, a mentor program for displaced journalists, teletraining on multimedia and business journalism topics, scholarships to attend conferences and training, and a revamp of our website to provide more robust services to members.

The event is free but donations to the SABEW Fund for the Future are requested as SABEW must raise $50,000 by August to qualify for a matching amount from four foundations.

Many of the business reporters who have recently lost their jobs worked at newspapers and magazines that have been shedding employees right and left because advertising revenue is plunging. Some of that is because of the recession, but much of it is because advertisers see fewer people reading those publications and are moving their ad dollars elsewhere.

So here is one way that you can help even if you can’t make the reception: Subscribe to your local paper or subscribe to some magazines. It doesn’t come with cocktails and canapes, but it’s pretty effective if enough people do it.

(Photo: Reuters)

Comments
One comment so far | RSS Comments RSS

Newpapers are obsolete, I surprised they lasted this long. you should pick a theme and commit to it, make yourself a media periodical
discuss music, movies, gaming etc. you will then become more viable with a larger consumer base

condense the nonsensical local stories, no on really cares about the flock of geese that nested on the highway or whatnot. no once cares about beatrice turning 150 years old. (hell beatrice doesnt even know she is 150)

if your content is more appealing, more people will purchase it, and you will get more money for ads, due to a higher consumer base simple math

but as for the news, its been done, daily at 5 and 10 repeated at 1

and can be found 24 hours a day on certain channels and online

your days are numbered paperboy! evolve or get out the way!

Posted by John | Report as abusive
 

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