MediaFile

Twitter vs. Facebook — you make the call

May 27, 2009

The top brass from Twitter and Facebook have been all over the place in recent days, starting with the Reuters Global Technology Summit. No matter the venue or the executive, the questions are pretty much the same: Are you going to put the company up for sale? If not, when are you going public? And how on earth are you going to make money? And when?

We’ll skip a rehash of yesterday’s news and interviews, but you can find articles just about anywhere you want. Reuters, The Wall Street Journal, The New York Post, BreakingViews, paidContent, Advertising Age, and, well, basically every other media outlet are carrying stories today about one or both of the web darlings.
So instead we’ll ask you a straightforward question. Which one — Facebook or Twitter — would you buy a piece of, if you could?

Keep an eye on:

  • The following from TechCrunch: “Sources close to AOL tell us that the board of directors will make a final decision on the AOL spinoff at a board meeting this Thursday, May 28, possibly undoing the $147 billion 2001 merger of the two companies. Sources characterize the decision as ‘a done deal’.”
  • Microsoft goes at Apple — again. The company plans to launch a new version of its Zune portable media player later this year in the United States, incorporating high-definition video, touch screen technology and Wi-Fi connection. (Reuters)
  • BookExpo America isn’t looking so hot this year. In the New York Post, Keith Kelly writes that “the turnout is expected to be way down — about 20 percent less exhibition space was booked this year — and many big publishers like Random House are cutting back while others like Macmillan and Rodale plan to skip the floor show entirely.”

(Photos: Twitter’s Biz Stone (l.), Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg (r.); Reuters)

Comments
7 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

Twitter!

Note that I almost missed the question — it hard to spot that question in the post above, broken up over 3 lines and wrapped around one of the pictures! :)
Ideas:
- bold the question itself, so it stands out more
- pose the question at the very beginning of the post, while you still have the attention of the reader (your target readers here are Facebook/Twitter users – people used to reading 140 character status updates, not 140+ word posts)
- ask the main question once again at the end and remind the reader his/her input is desired

Posted by Otis Gospodnetic | Report as abusive
 

Everybody’s an editor…

 

No comparison. Facebook allows many things, Twitters only allows 45 characters or less. Twitters only allows what they want you to says and nothing more. To much control on what you say.

Posted by messenger | Report as abusive
 

messenger:
Twitter has a 140 character limit and, as far as I know, doesn’t moderate people’s tweets. But yes, they are also wildly different. Twitter is just a subset of Facebook’s functionality (and user base).

Posted by Otis Gospodnetic | Report as abusive
 

Facebook is way beter. so many options, so many activities, fun with friends.

Posted by Facebook all the way! | Report as abusive
 

Twitter has my vote. It is simpler and from a user interface perspective has much less clutter. Twitter is a far better social networking tool, as it allows its users to randomly find other users with specific interests – if someone twits about a subject they are obviously interested or involved with that subject matter. I’m running a digital guidebook business for outdoor adventure locations, and have found Twitter to be a very useful tool to link with like minded individuals and companies. http://twitter.com/VirtualOutdoor

 

Facebook’s status update serves pretty much the same function as Twitter, but has lots of other service options as well. Facebook is the stronger of the two.

 

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