AOL changes its name to Aol

November 23, 2009

What’s in a name? The Internet pioneer formerly known as America Online, now known as AOL, will from next month be known as Aol. How do you pronounce that? We’re not sure but the idea seems to be make a break from the past without completely forgetting its roots.

AOL or Aol is, as you likely know, being spun-off from parent Time Warner on Dec 9 to once again be an independent company. It’s expected to have a market valuation in the $3 billion range, a tad smaller than the $163 billion market cap it had when it actually bought Time Warner back in 2000.

The company, will unveil its ‘Aol’ brand identity on Dec 10, the same day it starts trading on the New York Stock Exchange under the ‘AOL’ ticker (but don’t let that confuse you).

Global brand and innovation consultancy Wolff Olins were the clever chaps who decided that losing all contact with the past and coming up with a completely brand new name might be a step too far. In fact, according to Wolff Olins CEO Karl Heiselman, the new logo (below) is “something bold and exciting that sets AOL apart.”

Click here to see a corporate video about the new brand identity.

2 comments

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Sorry, this logo is for a multi-billion dollar company? Are you sure you didn’t ask a 4th grader to come up with it during his 3rd period Intro to Computers class? Come on, AOL.

Posted by JAMES | Report as abusive

And next year they’ll rename it “aol” and it will be just as lame as ever.

Posted by Don Pope | Report as abusive

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