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The CrunchPad lives, and it costs!

December 8, 2009

crunchpad-near-final-designThe CrunchPad was one of those things that you either thought “that sounds like a fine idea,” or “why bother?”

It all started a year ago when TechCrunch.com founder Michael Arrington decided he wanted to create a $200 tablet computer to surf the web. While you and I might talk a big game about building a perfect product, Arrington went on to actually get involved in a project and attempt to bring the device from fantasy to reality.

The tablet went through several prototypes, until finally, it all fell apart in a great moment of Internet drama that included threats of lawsuits and arguments over intellectual property. Long story short, Arrington’s former partners decided to sell the device without him. It will go on sale this Friday and supposedly ship in 8 to 10 weeks.

Other than changing its name to the Joo Joo (which is supposedly based on an African term for “magic”), the device by Fusion Garage will now cost a whopping $499, or $299 more than Arrington wrote in his Internet manifesto.

It remains to be seen how this device will stack up against others, including the possible 800 lb gorilla sitting in the corner.

(Image by TechCrunch)

Comments
2 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

Joo Joo I thought was spelled Ju Ju which is a West African word for magic or mystical object / person. You can also have a bad feeling and call it bad juju.

I thought this was an awesome name especially for this tablet. If it is for $299 then that is good juju if it is for $499 then it is bad juju. lol

Posted by tribalglow | Report as abusive
 

Lesson Number One:

Pricing pain point for anything like this plummets when you give it a silly name.

Posted by HBC | Report as abusive
 

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