MediaFile

CES: HP demos Android smartbook

January 9, 2010

qualcommThe nascent smartbook market got a big nudge forward on Friday, courtesy of Hewlett-Packard, the world’s biggest personal computer maker.

Todd Bradley, executive vice president of HP’s PC division, turned up on stage at the Consumer Electronics Show during a keynote address by Qualcomm CEO Paul Jacobs to demo a device based on Qualcomm’s Snapdragon chip and running Google’s mobile Android software.

There was no formal product unveiling, but HP showed off a smartbook with multitouch capability, and Bradley spoke with apparent interest on the  category, which is just beginning to build steam.

“We’re not going to make any announcement today but you know how interested and focused and frankly committed we are to this space,” Bradley said.

Smartbooks run on low-power ARM-based processors like Snapdragon or Nvidia’s Tegra, as opposed to netbooks, which run on Intel’s x86-based Atom platform.

There was certainly some buzz around smartbooks at CES, following the unveiling of Lenovo’s innovative Skylight device, and its IdeaPad U1 (which also run on Snapdragon.) Nvidia showed off a number of prototype mobile computing devices, but made no formal announcements about any products, as some had anticipated.

Intel likely isn’t sweating just yet; its dominance of the traditional PC CPU market isn’t under imminent threat. It remains to be seen how consumers will react to the smartbook phenomenon. The battery-friendly devices offer less processing power than Atom, but plenty of juice to do things most folks want to do, like surf the Web and watch movies.

Bob Morris, director of mobile computing for ARM Holdings Plc, which licenses the chip architecture used by the smartbook semiconductor companies, said the race has just begun.

“We’re only 2 years in a 5- to 7-year change in the industry.”

Comments
4 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

Well, it would appear that by hiding in the back rooms, HP, Lenovo, Verizon and more really didn’t win as many points with the real attendees as they could have. Interesting comments posted at http://www.fromwhereistand.info

Posted by SalVoce | Report as abusive
 

While ARM Holding is going up and Intel Corporation is moving down, I therefore have no doubt who will end up being a clear winner in the race to become no.1 micro chip producer in the years to come.

ARM with it ARM7 and ARM9 processor can easily take on Intel Atom for many reasons, firstly ARM7 and ARM9 consume less power and have longer standby times the Intel Atom processor. Secondly the ARM7 and ARM9 is much smaller in size then the Intel Atom, this will reduce cost for hardware vendors.

ARM Holding to date powers more then 95% of the smart phones, such as Nokia N7 Mini and iPhone, Blackberry and host of other communication devices such as TV Music player and set-top boxes.

source:
http://www.payasyougomobilephones.mobi
http://www.pricelooker.co.uk

Posted by pageidea | Report as abusive
 

Would have been really nice to have been able to see and play with this while I was at CES! Thanks for NOTHING HP!

Read the CES wrapup post mentioned at fromwhereistand.info. He’s got alot of good points and observations. He was WAY TOO KIND to the companies that didn’t show up on the public side of the floor. I would have cut them a well deserved new one!

Posted by LarryDonaldson | Report as abusive
 

ARM Holdings is a rising star in the field of Micro Processors to power the Mobile Internet Device. ARM have an advantage over it competitors such as AMD and Intel. ARM only design it the processors and the license the technologies to host of other vendors, such as ST Micro Electronics, Toshiba, Nokia, Apple, Nvida and to many, many more companies. The list can really go on and on.

Source:
http://www.contract-mobile-phones.org

Posted by pageidea | Report as abusive
 

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