MediaFile

Apple: think different, apologize different

July 16, 2010

Apple AntennagateNot many companies can get away putting out an expensive product with a pretty big technical glitch and still have sales zoom to the stratosphere.

Unless of course, you happen to be Apple.

The company held a rare press conference on Friday, where Chief Executive Steve Jobs addressed issues that the antenna on the iPhone 4 is not exactly up to snuff.  Depending on how the user holds the phone, the signal could drop. Lefties are particularly hard hit by this snafu.

So Jobs offered up iPhone owners a free case to help alleviate the problem, and, after being pressed on it during a question and answer session, issued an apology to customers.

But the whole presentation was conducted in a tone that observers characterized as defiant – and included some comments that are sure to raise eyebrows. Here are just a few gathered by Reuters reporter Poornima Gupta. We’ll leave you to judge:

“We are just a band of people working our asses off to surprise and delight people. We are human.”

“There is no antennagate.”

The New York Times is “making stuff up” and Bloomberg’s reporting is “a total crock” regarding the iPhone’s issues.

“This is life in smartphone world. Phones aren’t perfect. Most every smartphone we tested behaved like this.”

“There is a problem but that problem is affecting a small percentage of users.”

“The heart of the problem is that smartphones have weak spots. We made it very visible.”

“I see some of these people jumping on us now. It’s like I am not sure what you are after here. Would you rather we were a Korean company instead of an American company? You do not like the fact that we are innovating right here in America and leading the world in what we do?”

Apple Atennagate 2

Comments
4 comments so far | RSS Comments RSS

Let’s just hope that they don’t screw up their next four product launches the way that they did the iPhone 4. Here are the launches in case you are curious.

VERY FUNNY Apple products.

http://www.dailygoat.com/?p=1491

Posted by pchrun | Report as abusive
 

I have never seen Microsoft make any statement other than their products were perfect and any problems were someone else’s fault.

Posted by Slammy | Report as abusive
 

At least the iPhone apps aren’t failing to disappoint. Just found out that you can even scan product bar codes with your iPhone camera for apps like the MyRegistry.com Universal Wishlist with Barcode Scanner iPhone app. I used this app on my new iPhone4 to help manage my wedding registry for my wedding in November and I can’t even begin to tell you how much stress was alleviated from my wedding planning with this app! For any of you bride or grooms-to-be out there, the MyRegistry.com Universal Wishlist with Barcode Scanner iPhone app is an absolute steal for $.99 . Despite the apparent service glitches with dropped calls, I had zero issues with using the MyRegistry.com Universal Wishlist with Barcode Scanner iPhone app. I was able to go into stores, scan product barcodes for items that I wanted for my wedding registry, and those items were automatically added to my online MyRegistry.com wedding wish list. I could also look up friends registries and create e-Cards to share my registry info with friends and family…all from my iPhone. The service and luxuries that are available now through amazing iPhone apps like this are just mind blowing.

Posted by Elle2882 | Report as abusive
 

There are other faults with the iphone & other phones using touch screen technology. The use of touch screen in industrial situations, building sites, farming, landscaping etc is very problematic. The screen is liable to be damaged by dropping, by dirt, etc. If I’d thought a bit more about the limitations of the iphone, I’d never have bought one. The telcos love the fact that the screen dials numbers at any slight touch and the user pays for the mistake. Apple has created a money making device for telephone companies that has no lock device worth the name.

Posted by ern_malleyscrub | Report as abusive
 

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