MediaFile

Attention WalMart and BestBuy Shoppers – Facebook Credits on aisle 5

October 26, 2010

It’s been about nine months since Facebook rolled out its virtual currency, Facebook Credits.

Now the Internet social networking giant will make its Credits widely available in the physical world, by selling them on pre-paid gift cards available at Best Buy and FBCreditsWalMart stores in the United States.

No, you can’t use Facebook Credits to buy a six-pack of beer or a new iPod. The currency remains limited to use in the social games and applications popular on Facebook, where people can use Facebook Credits to buy virtual crops for planting in the Farmville game, for example.

Facebook began selling Facebook Credit gift cards at Target stores earlier this year, but landing on WalMart and Best Buy shelves should vastly expand the availability of its fledgling currency – at the end of 2009, WalMart had more than 3,600 stores in the United States.

Facebook won’t say what percentage of its more than 500 million users currently use Credits, though the company says the idea of selling Credits cards  in brick-and-mortar retail stores is to expand access to a broader group of people and to increase the use of Credits.

And with Facebook taking a 30 percent cut of the revenue that application-makers book on transactions involving Facebook credits, the more people that are using Credits, the better for Facebook.

Facebook Credits gift cards will be available, beginning this week, in denominations of $10, $25 and $50 at BestBuy and $5, $10 and $25 at WalMart, with a special $50 card available at Walmart.com.

Comments
One comment so far | RSS Comments RSS

given the size of facebooks reach this is great news but why can’t we tie in on sustainable global projects and assist “United Nations” offering facebook penny credit shares schemes?

Posted by towingadapter | Report as abusive
 

Post Your Comment

We welcome comments that advance the story through relevant opinion, anecdotes, links and data. If you see a comment that you believe is irrelevant or inappropriate, you can flag it to our editors by using the report abuse links. Views expressed in the comments do not represent those of Reuters. For more information on our comment policy, see http://blogs.reuters.com/fulldisclosure/2010/09/27/toward-a-more-thoughtful-conversation-on-stories/