MediaFile

Spotify isn’t in talks to be bought by Apple or anyone – source

October 26, 2010

Music industry types must have had been reaching for their tranquilizers this afternoon, following a report that Apple is in early stage talks to buy Spotify. The report spread quickly, as these things do, and some thought it made  a lot of sense.  So Apple, maker of the world’s most popular music device, the iPod,  which already owns the No.1 music  download retailer iTunes, would be buying Spotify –the much-loved and critically acclaimed music streaming service, just as it’s finalizing deals to launch in the U.S.? This would be too much to handle for many music executives, who think Apple already holds way too much power.

They’ll probably be relieved to know that after an initial flurry of panicky phone calls we got a helpful call from one person close to Spotify, who shot down  rumors of a potential sale to Apple or anyone else  as  “completely untrue”.

Founder Daniel Ek has often tried to position Spotify as a company working with the music industry for the long term, as he did here on his company blog.

So to make it very clear – we are in this for the long haul. We are committed to building a music service that works across different devices, enables you to share music socially and that gives you the ability to choose how you want to access music. We aren’t interested in just trying to hype the company and then “flipping it”. The media coverage that Spotify has received so far is because of the product. The product has been our core and our main marketing message, and perhaps now is the time to modify that message.

That was a year ago but that hasn’t changed we hear, though we wonder if his investors feel the same way?

Apple as usual declined to comment.

Here’s Ek doing a demo at South By Southwest:

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