Comments on: Facebook is worth $52 billion, and that’s not a good thing. http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2010/12/14/facebook-is-worth-52-billion-and-thats-not-a-good-thing/ Where media and technology meet Wed, 16 Nov 2016 08:48:25 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: kpkelleher http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2010/12/14/facebook-is-worth-52-billion-and-thats-not-a-good-thing/#comment-385531 Wed, 29 Dec 2010 19:26:11 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/?p=23599#comment-385531 @jbjorn
>”I would be embarrassed if I was the writer.”

And if you were the writer, you might have a better understanding of English grammar.

Markets aren’t as black and white as you seem to think. For every aberration like your “TechBubble” (I’m not sure why you use an inner cap), there are more examples of stocks being fairly priced by the market. I am sorry if the omission of the obvious upset you. My point was simply that fair value is much more likely to be found in a liquid market than an illiquid one.

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By: jbjorn http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2010/12/14/facebook-is-worth-52-billion-and-thats-not-a-good-thing/#comment-385423 Fri, 24 Dec 2010 15:41:38 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/?p=23599#comment-385423 This is hilarious:

“The valuations are specious, though, because they aren’t derived by the wisdom of the crowd in the public markets, or even the wisdom of a group of seasoned venture investors.”

Really? “The wisdom of the crowd in pubic markets.” Any light reading of economic history shreds this fundamental misconception.

“The wisdom of seasoned venture investors”??? You have to be kidding. See TechBubble late 90s’.

This is just poor, sloppy writing with a poor, quickly-formed angle. I would be embarrassed if I was the writer.

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By: eanmdphd http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2010/12/14/facebook-is-worth-52-billion-and-thats-not-a-good-thing/#comment-385415 Fri, 24 Dec 2010 12:03:16 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/?p=23599#comment-385415 That is a lot of money to be in valuation. I wonder what will happen to it. I understand the sideline / private transactions, but wonder where does $26 billion come from to make the purchase of 50% of the company.

I know many companies have billions sitting on the sidelines; are they waiting for companies like FB to go public?

Then, what does FB do with the $26 billion? Create a GATES-like foundation to distribute it to deemed worthy causes.

How is this much money handled?

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By: mrce500 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2010/12/14/facebook-is-worth-52-billion-and-thats-not-a-good-thing/#comment-385391 Thu, 23 Dec 2010 17:13:49 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/?p=23599#comment-385391 Bogus – a ponzi without promises

These exchanges serve a valuable function of matching buyers of alternative assets with sellers.

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By: mrce500 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2010/12/14/facebook-is-worth-52-billion-and-thats-not-a-good-thing/#comment-385390 Thu, 23 Dec 2010 17:12:05 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/?p=23599#comment-385390 Facebook is private and has one ownner and many employees.

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By: mrce500 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2010/12/14/facebook-is-worth-52-billion-and-thats-not-a-good-thing/#comment-385389 Thu, 23 Dec 2010 17:10:32 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/?p=23599#comment-385389 Time to tax Facebook on book value?

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By: hodges3737 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2010/12/14/facebook-is-worth-52-billion-and-thats-not-a-good-thing/#comment-385357 Wed, 22 Dec 2010 20:49:23 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/?p=23599#comment-385357 Do you have Mark Zuckerberg’s phone number???

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By: RickMichigan http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2010/12/14/facebook-is-worth-52-billion-and-thats-not-a-good-thing/#comment-385134 Thu, 16 Dec 2010 18:55:53 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/?p=23599#comment-385134 I agree with you 100% DisgustedReader.

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By: DisgustedReader http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2010/12/14/facebook-is-worth-52-billion-and-thats-not-a-good-thing/#comment-385115 Wed, 15 Dec 2010 19:51:08 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/?p=23599#comment-385115 Ever noticed that each bubble is bigger than the last? The real estate bubble was bigger than the dot-com bubble, and a new bubble laced with hyperinflation will likely become the mother of all bubbles in U.S. history.

Also note that when each bigger bubble pops, deeper pain, suffering and death ensues. That suggests that when this bubble pops, we will be standing knee deep in blood. But not to worry! A bigger bubble will likely following with misery you cannot even fathom to follow!

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