MediaFile

Super Bowl Monday: The view from armchair copywriters

February 7, 2011

Ahhh, Super Bowl Monday. The hangovers. The salsa stains on the sofa. The dreams of winning your office betting pool crushed. And the ad reviews. Yes, today is the day when everyone — many with little or no connection to advertising, football or tastemaking — puts out a list of the top Super Bowl commercials. Some are better than others. USA Today’s Super Bowl Ad Meter is probably the best known (and this morning had Bud Light’s Dog Sitter ad ranked tops). But two others that are very good gauges of the winners/losers of the Ad Bowl are TiVo and the Kellogg Super Bowl Advertising Review.

They take very different approaches to rankings.  TiVo ranks the most engaging moments “using aggregated, anonymous, second-by-second audience measurement data” while Kellogg goes with the panel approach that asks viewers to grade ads based on “Attention, Distinction, Positioning, Linkage, Amplification and Net equity.”

Three ads/brands were ranked highly by both TiVo and Kellogg:

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But there were also some glaring differences in the two polls. For instance, the top spot in Tivo went to Snickers, followed by Best Buy and Pepsi Max. Kellogg gave all three of those middle-of-the-road rankings (Snickers and Best Buy each a received B, while Pepsi Max took a C.

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Comments
One comment so far | RSS Comments RSS

The best Superbowl Ad? Easy, all the ones we did not see during Super Bowl 40 when in Australia in 2006. There were none on Aussie Tellie that I recall on the live feed on a Monday afternoon. So we saw the whole game commercial free except for a few brief station breaks. It was marvelous to See all of the nuances that occur on and off the field De Combat.(Steelers 21, Seahawks 10).

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