MediaFile

Tech wrap: How bold is the new BlackBerry?

May 2, 2011

RIM showed off a new version of its BlackBerry Bold phone with upgraded software, aiming to regain its stride after last week’s profit warning and other recent stumbles. RIM also said it will manage corporate and government communications sent using Apple’s iPhone and iPad, and devices running Google’s Android software, through its secure BlackBerry Enterprise Server.

The BlackBerry Bold Touch, the model most geared toward the business market, has a 2.8-inch screen and retains the company’s trademark physical qwerty keyboard with a 1.2 GHz processor. It will ship with a near-field communication (NFC) chip, allowing the phone to be used as a mobile wallet, executives said at the annual BlackBerry World conference in Orlando. The Bold Touch running on Blackberry OS 7 will be released sometime this summer. The new OS won’t be supported on older devices, the company said.

Sohaib Athar, a resident of Abbottabad, the Pakistani city where Osama bin Laden was holed up in a fortified mansion, “liveblogged the Osama raid without knowing it”, setting off a firestorm of activity on Twitter.

Sony Online Entertainment temporarily shut down its online games service. A spokesman for the online games unit said the service was taken down at 1:30 am Pacific time on Monday. The spokesman declined to say how many customers were affected and none were alerted beyond a terse message on its website. Sony Online Entertainment is a division of the global electronics company that operates online games such as “EverQuest” and is separate from the PlayStation video game console division.

Sony won over some gamers by offering free access to its PlayStation Network to compensate for the leak of personal details on 78 million user accounts, but still had some way to go to regain the trust of consumers.

It’s doubtful that Sony’s handling of the Playstation debacle will be its Watergate, but so far it’s not its Tylenol, either, writes Wired’s John C. Abell.

Dish Network and EchoStar will pay TiVo $500 million to settle a patent infringement lawsuit involving TiVo’s video recording technology, putting an end to a long and costly legal battle.

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