Tech wrap: Google reveals Gmail hacking

June 1, 2011

Google revealed that unknown hackers likely originating from central China tried to hack into the Gmail accounts of hundreds of users, including senior U.S. government officials, Chinese activists and journalists. Google said on its official blog that the hackers, who appeared to originate from Jinan, China, recently tried to crack and monitor email accounts by stealing passwords, but Google detected and “disrupted” the campaign.

More than 80 percent of the companies that advertise on Twitter renew their marketing efforts on the microblogging service, Twitter CEO Dick Costolo said. The company counts roughly 600 advertisers, up from 150 advertisers at the end of 2010. And while Twitter has stepped up efforts to build an advertising business, Costolo said Twitter was not under pressure to boost revenue and that the Internet company’s long-term success was not “correlated” to an initial public offering of Twitter’s stock.

Analysts predicted more gloom ahead for Nokia and the struggling phone maker was forced to deny talk it would sell its core business to Microsoft. The company’s stock fell as much as 10 percent but recovered in late trading, sparked by a website report that said its software partner Microsoft would buy out its phones business for $19 billion. Nokia called the report “100 percent baseless.” Microsoft declined to comment.

Microsoft has told chipmakers who want to use the next version of Windows for tablet computers, to work with only one manufacturer to speed up delivery, Bloomberg said, citing people with knowledge of the matter.

Google Executive Chairman Eric Schmidt told a conference that Facebook had rebuffed its entreaties to team up, while acknowledging he had not pushed hard enough to address the rising threat posed by the social networking site during his tenure as CEO.

“Three years ago I wrote memos talking about this general problem. I knew that I had to do something and I failed to do it,” Schmidt said.

Film studio Miramax and Internet video company Hulu signed a multi-year agreement to bring films made by the studio to some Hulu subscribers. Hulu Plus subscribers, who get access to some premium content, will be able to watch films like Pulp Fiction, Good Will Hunting and Scream, as part of the agreement.

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