MediaFile

Apple and Twitter: A New Power Duo?

June 7, 2011

One big winner coming out of Apple’s developers’ conference on Monday is Twitter.

Apple announced that the Internet microblogging service will be integrated directly into future versions of the iPhone and iPad software.

That means iPhone users can quickly publish information on Twitter by tapping on a photo taken with the iPhone’s camera, or by tapping on a news article in the phone’s Web browser.

It’s the kind of front-and-center placement that any of Apple’s thousands of app-makers would kill for, and it will likely provide a nice boost to Twitter’s traffic of 140-character Tweets.

It may also represent the latest alliance in the ongoing battle of the technology titans.

The collaboration between Apple and Twitter could signal a new power duo, playing in smartphones and social networking – the two powerful forces that are re-shaping today’s computing, advertising and media markets.

How deep the Apple/Twitter partnership may be is still unclear. Twitter referred questions to Apple about whether the integration involved any financial terms, and Apple did not return a request for comment.

While Twitter is being woven directly into the iPhone, Facebook, the far more popular social networking service, was notably absent.

Of course, Facebook has forged its own ties with Microsoft (Microsoft has invested in Facebook and the two companies have a search partnership). And Microsoft, through its partnership with Nokia, is hoping to become a bigger player in the smartphone market.

Meanwhile Google, the maker of the top smartphone operating system, Android, is intently focused on competing against both Apple and Facebook, and earlier this year was reported to have looked at acquiring Twitter.

By cozying up to Twitter, Apple may have turned up the competitive heat on Google. What happens next is anyone’s guess.

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