Comments on: The real meaning of “hack” http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2011/07/26/the-real-meaning-of-hack/ Where media and technology meet Wed, 16 Nov 2016 08:48:25 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: readyforthenet http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2011/07/26/the-real-meaning-of-hack/#comment-390220 Thu, 18 Aug 2011 03:15:57 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/?p=28279#comment-390220 I came across the title of this article and was curious. The first part of the article was all about Mr. Penenberg trying to convince us that he is an expert on hacking. All Mr. Penenberg convinced me is that he is a prolific writer and uses his interpretation of hack and hacker in his writings.

Mr. Penenberg is definitely correct in that these terms are overused and misused. What he fails to mention (or perhaps is not aware) that both terms were widely used long before becoming exclusively used in technology.

Back in the early 1980’s while I was at MIT, the terms hack, hacking and hacker were widely used, sometimes associated with technology but not exclusively. For more information on the “real” meaning of hack I would suggest reading the book “Nightwork” by T. F. Peterson.

Often in the English language, certain words have a standard definition or origin, but a more common use of the word that does not necessarily adhere to the strict definition or original use of the word. The collection of terms associated with the word hack have become exclusively associated with computers and the Internet, while at the same time lack a bounded definition.

For me, I’d change the Merriam-Webster definition of hacker and revert back to the original MIT definition: “…someone who does some sort of interesting and creative work at a high intensity level. This applies to anything from writing computer programs to pulling a clever prank that amuses and delights everyone…”. Quote courtesy of the MIT IHTFP Hack FAQ site (I came across the title of this article and was curious. The first part of the article was all about Mr. Penenberg trying to convince us that he is an expert on hacking. All Mr. Penenberg convinced me is that he is a prolific writer and uses his interpretation of hack and hacker in his writings.
Mr. Penenberg is definitely correct in that these terms are overused and misused. What he fails to mention (or perhaps is not aware) that both terms were widely used long before becoming exclusively used in technology.
30 years ago while I was at MIT, the terms hack, hacking and hacker were widely used, sometimes associated with technology but not exclusively. For more information on the “real” meaning of hack I would suggest reading the book “Nightwork” by T. F. Peterson.
Often in the English language, certain words have a standard definition or origin, but a more common use of the word that does not necessarily adhere to the strict definition or original use of the word. The collection of terms associated with the word hack have become exclusively associated with computers and the Internet, while at the same time lack a bounded definition.
For me, I’d change the Merriam-Webster definition of hacker and revert back to the original MIT definition: “…someone who does some sort of interesting and creative work at a high intensity level. This applies to anything from writing computer programs to pulling a clever prank that amuses and delights everyone…”. Quote courtesy of the MIT IHTFP Hack FAQ site.
I came across the title of this article and was curious. The first part of the article was all about Mr. Penenberg trying to convince us that he is an expert on hacking. All Mr. Penenberg convinced me is that he is a prolific writer and uses his interpretation of hack and hacker in his writings.

Mr. Penenberg is definitely correct in that these terms are overused and misused. What he fails to mention (or perhaps is not aware) that both terms were widely used long before becoming exclusively used in technology.
30 years ago while I was at MIT, the terms hack, hacking and hacker were widely used, sometimes associated with technology but not exclusively. For more information on the “real” meaning of hack I would suggest reading the book “Nightwork” by T. F. Peterson.

Often in the English language, certain words have a standard definition or origin, but a more common use of the word that does not necessarily adhere to the strict definition or original use of the word. The collection of terms associated with the word hack have become exclusively associated with computers and the Internet, while at the same time lack a bounded definition.

For me, I’d change the Merriam-Webster definition of hacker and revert back to the original MIT definition: “…someone who does some sort of interesting and creative work at a high intensity level. This applies to anything from writing computer programs to pulling a clever prank that amuses and delights everyone…”. Quote courtesy of the MIT IHTFP Hack FAQ site..

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By: MalCon http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2011/07/26/the-real-meaning-of-hack/#comment-389813 Wed, 27 Jul 2011 08:05:51 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/?p=28279#comment-389813 Good article Adam. For example – if a programmer wrote 100 lines to do a job, and another programmer does the same job in fewer lines of code, say 60 – it’s a hack. And hack does not necessarily mean use of technology. Even religion is a hack – for proper exploitation of it can make people behave or do things in a certain way. Human emotions such as love, fear, hate, anger, faith, trust – all can be exploited for hacking :)

Im reminded of the Fravia’s (fravia+) classic Reality cracking lab articles.

I hope this article is read by one and all.

rajsm, creator – MalCon.

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