MediaFile

EA: We love Wii U

October 6, 2011

Back in June, everyone was talking about the Wii U, Nintendo’s first video game console with high-definition graphics unveiled at the Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3) in Los Angeles.

Since then, no one’s heard much more about Wii U, which has a tablet screen for a controller and can be used in conjunction with Wii remotes. Nintendo must be hunkering down to put the finishing touches on it before it hits stores sometime next year.

But Peter Moore, the video game industry veteran who was promoted to be Electronic Arts’ chief operating officer in August, told Reuters this week that everything appears to be on track with the Wii U, at least from his perspective working for a publisher making games for it.

“There are no indications that there’s anything that feels like it’s off target,” Moore said. Nintendo’s stock has taken a beating in recent months and its share price is approaching its low for the year.

Moore said he will be visiting Nintendo’s hometown of Kyoto next week to check on how the console is shaping up.

“From our perspective right now, specs are a big deal,” he said, adding that during his trip, he will looking to find out more about the gadget’s graphic and computer processing units, its price and when it might be shipped.

Moore, who has experience launching consoles from his days at Microsoft, says Nintendo was smart to incorporate a tablet into the console with the Wii U.

“No one thinks its going to replace an iPad 2 but it is playing into what a consumer feels comfortable with,” Moore said.

In the past, publishers have backed away from dedicating too much content to Nintendo platforms, since the Japanese company tended to use its consoles to push its own software titles. But make no mistake, EA is on board with the Wii U, Moore said.

“Our teams are working on it around the world. Our key franchises will be there. We’ve made that commitment to Nintendo.”

Photo of Wii courtesy of Nintendo

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