MediaFile

Tech wrap: Apple changes course on iAd

December 13, 2011

The WSJ.com reports that Apple is softening its approach to its iAd mobile advertising service due to the tepid response as it loses ground to Google in the fast-growing mobile-ad market.

Marketers say they have been turned off by iAd’s high price tag as well as Apple’s hard-charging sales tactics and its stringent control over the creative process which has forced Apple to make some changes.

Facebook is probably not the first place that comes to mind when contemplating new career opportunities.

But Monster.com, the career search website, hopes to change that with BeKnown, a professional networking app that allows users to build their professional identities within Facebook.

Staying with Facebook, Bloomberg reports that the social networking site is planning its first push into mobile advertising by the end of March, giving the company a fresh source of revenue ahead of a possible initial public offering, two people with knowledge of the matter said.

With Apple said to be in talks to buy Israel’s Anobit, a maker of flash storage technology, Forbes.com says that Flash memory is becoming one of the biggest tech stories of the year.

U.S. safety investigators called for a nationwide ban on texting and cell phone use while driving, a prohibition that would include certain applications of hands-free technology becoming more common in new cars.

Finally, Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen is planning to build a spaceship that could replace the Space Shuttle this decade.

Allen is hoping his new company — called Stratolaunch Systems — will launch unmanned rockets from a flying carrier plane to ferry government and commercial payloads into space and back, and eventually evolve to human space missions.

 

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