Tech wrap: Era of .yournamehere domains arrives

January 12, 2012

ICANN, the body that oversees the Internet’s naming system, gave the green light for organizations to begin applying to name and run their own domains instead of entrusting them to the operators of .com, .org, .gov and others. Up to 2,000 applications were expected for the so-called “top-level” international domains. At $185,000 per application, estimated start-up costs of $500,000 and annual running costs of about $100,000, a .yournamehere domain will be out of reach of the smallest companies and organizations. But applications were expected from cities or regions with strong identities, such as .london and .mumbai, from companies aiming to build a business based on new domains, and from community identifiers like .eco or .gay.

Samsung is open to forging an alliance with troubled Olympus, potentially joining other electronics firms in circling one of the world’s biggest names in medical equipment, sources said. Samsung has ruled out any interest in Olympus’s loss-making camera business, but a company source said that it might consider an alliance with Olympus in other areas. Earlier, the Asahi Shimbun newspaper reported that Olympus was scouting for a friendly investor to take a minority stake in the company, and that Olympus had drawn up a short-list of five potential partners, including Samsung, Sony, Panasonic, Japanese medical-equipment firm Terumo, and Fujifilm Holdings.

LG is in talks with various parties on possible partnerships, the head of LG’s mobile business said, as the world’s No.3 handset maker seeks to turn around its struggling handset operation. The  firm, however, remains committed to its mobile business and does not have any plan to ditch the loss-making operation, Park Jong-seok, chief executive of LG’s mobile communications business, told Reuters.

FCC chairman Julius Genachowski said that he had received bi-partisan support from a group of U.S. senators for so-called “incentive” auctions of wireless spectrum without legislative restrictions. Genachowski is looking for approval to give broadcasters a financial incentive to return unused spectrum licenses to the FCC so it can then auction off the spectrum to companies offering mobile data services.

TomTom said an official probe had cleared it of accusations that it violated Dutch data protection laws by sharing its customers’ individual location and traffic information with third parties, including Dutch police. The navigation equipment and map maker came under scrutiny in April after reportedly selling information gathered through its customers’ personal navigation devices in their cars, to third parties, without their consent.

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I expect dot brand to be a game changer in Search potentially taking away traffic from Google. Here’s an example.

2015, I see an ad for Nike’s new T100 and want to know more. What are my options?
1. Google search for “T100 Nike”. Nike’s site will appear together with a lot of other sites. I click on the Nike site, but it’s not guaranteed I will end up on the T100 info page.
2. I type in nike.com in the browser and use Nike’s internal search tool to find T100.
3. I type t100.nike in the browser and go directly to the info page at Nike’s website.

If you are a native internet users you will quickly adapt to search like this, and which option do you think that Nike prefers?

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