MediaFile

Filmgoers to eat up more ‘Hunger Games’

March 30, 2012
By the size of last weekend’s lines, you’d think everyone had already seen “The Hunger Games.” But box office watchers are predicting another big turnout for the post-apocalyptic action movie this weekend.
 

The record-setting Lions Gate blockbuster that stormed into theaters last Friday should pull in another $60 million or more in the United States and Canada, according to a forecast from Hollywood.com.

 

A tally like that would land the movie about teens forced to fight to the death among the top second-weekend performers of all time. “Hunger Games” would rank seventh on that list if it hits $60 million, according to website Box Office Mojo. The record for second-weekend ticket sales belongs, unsurprisingly, to 2009′s “Avatar.” That movie took in $75.6 million during its second weekend and went on to become the highest-grossing film ever.

“Hunger Games” opened with a stunning $152.5 million last weekend, the third-highest film opening in history and biggest debut for a non-sequel. By this Sunday, the book adaptation’s 10-day domestic haul may top $250 million, said Paul Dergarabedian, president of the box office division of Hollywood.com.

For the masses who have already seen “Hunger Games,” two new films are reaching the big screen. Action movie “Wrath of the Titans” starring Sam Worthington, Liam Neeson and Ralph Fiennes, battles for the fan-boy audience. The movie is a 3D sequel to 2010 Olympian epic “Clash of the Titans.” Time Warner Inc’s Warner Bros., the studio behind the film, projects domestic weekend sales of about $40 million.

For families, an updated “Snow White” story called “Mirror Mirror” stars Julia Roberts as the evil queen in a comedy-and-adventure twist on the classic fairy tale. Distributor Relativity Media projects the movie’s domestic receipts will reach the low-$20 million range.

 Photo Credit: Lions Gate/Murray Close

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