MediaFile

Swipp looks to quantify your comments

June 21, 2012

Silicon Valley start-up Swipp says it has raised $3.5 million in funding from venture firm Old Willow Partners, an early investors in Groupon. It will use the cash to develop and launch its first products sometime in late fall. On the subject of what exactly those products will be, Chief Executive and co-founder Don Thorson was cagey. But it seems like he’s aiming to create a social network where it would be easier for consumers and merchants to analyze or make money from data than on say Twitter or Facebook.

“With (so many) people connected we should be able to do so much more than just tell each other where we’re having lunch,” said the executive, adding that conversations on social networks like Facebook and Twitter are “pretty cool stuff but not meaningful data. The bigger the network gets the smarter it should get.”

A basic Twitter search of a particular hot topic like a service price increase or a new product can already give a snapshot of how people are reacting, But that’s not enough for Thorston “We think that’s just a really 1.0 way of being able to extract information,” he said. With Swipp “you’ll have quantifiable data on that topic.” For example, it could figure out what percentage of comments were complaints and what percentage were positive.

 

So is it like tripadvisor.com but on a broader scale? Thorson would not be drawn much further on the subject except to say that he does not expect to use data from comments on existing networks, but rather from Swipp. It could take some time to build up a network , he acknowledged.

Thorson himself is no stranger to start-ups. He was chief marketing officer of  Web telephony company Jajah, which was sold to Telefonica in 2010. Another start-up Ribbit was sold to British Telecom in 2008.

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