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As Apple’s Passbook hits the scene, Tello tries to end coupon envy

September 19, 2012

iPhone users get the closest thing Apple has made to a digital wallet on Wednesday with the release of iOS 6’s new Passbook app, which stores electronic coupons, loyalty cards and tickets.

But where will all those nifty new digital coupons come from?

For coffee shops, corner pizzerias and other small businesses that don’t have in-house engineers to create their own Passbook coupons, a new service launching Wednesday aims to make it easy.

PassTools is a Web-based service that lets businesses quickly create Passbook coupons with a few clicks. The service, which costs $99 a month for up to 1,000 Passbook coupons or tickets, is the latest product from Tello, a Silicon Valley start-up that has until now focused on an online customer-feedback service for businesses.

“This is just another tool in the arsenal for businesses to get feedback,” said Tello co-founder Joe Beninato, noting that coupons and reward cards can provide an ideal channel for businesses to solicit information on customer satisfaction.

Since Apple first discussed Passbook in June, Tello has raced to build the PassTools product, working closely with the iPhone maker, said Beninato. In the coming weeks,  Tello will release additional features aimed at larger businesses, such as airlines offering boarding passes, he said.

And with more than 2 million Passbook-enabled iPhone 5’s pre-ordered in the first 24 hours of availability, there will be no shortage of consumers checking their phones for coupons.

Comments
One comment so far | RSS Comments RSS

$99 a month on top of the discount they offer with the coupons? Rather expensive, isn’t that? Judging from the last sentence I’d say this article’s purpose is to push businesses to pay the $99/month fee to use the service to create these coupons. Something like an “advertorial.”

Posted by RobinLee | Report as abusive
 

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