Comments on: After Aaron Swartz http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2013/01/18/after-aaron-swartz/ Where media and technology meet Wed, 16 Nov 2016 08:48:25 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.2.5 By: DonaCollins http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2013/01/18/after-aaron-swartz/#comment-442219 Tue, 22 Jan 2013 17:24:37 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/?p=36171#comment-442219 My condolences to the family of Aaron Swartz and all who have lost loved ones to depression and suicide. I have to wonder, honestly, not just about the tech industry but about the economy as a whole. I’m seeing more and more people turning to freelancing, for example, in an attempt to make work. No matter what niche, things can be very lonely and people who were once bubbly and personable are becoming quiet, withdrawn, and moody. I have several friends who are working multiple part-time jobs to get by, and one has developed an alcohol dependency (thankfully, one she acknowledges and is seeking help for). Still, there are others I know who do tech and design work who struggle with depression and alcoholism who know they have problems but – like you said – shun the idea of any type of therapy or help. I wonder what can be done – by you as a group of professionals or by us as loving family members and friends – to convince these people that real help is out there?

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By: tmc http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2013/01/18/after-aaron-swartz/#comment-442091 Mon, 21 Jan 2013 13:53:26 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/?p=36171#comment-442091 High intelligence has always been a two edged sword. Couples with a learned anti-social behavior, it increases the chances of mental instability. For the majority of programmers today their job is to interpret imperfect human requirements with contradicting evidence and translate that into computer logic that doesn’t understand “sometimes”. This I would bet exacerbates the issue for them. Historically though, I think the intellectuals of the world are in far better shape than ever before. If you think about it, having an IQ over 125 most likely got you killed or jailed for the last 2500 years. Think about the Khmer Rouge as late as the 1970’s. I think for those intellectuals, it is harder to adapt and be accepted in the local society than it is for their opposite, the mentally impaired. About a year ago I was talking with a employee of a client while she was having a smoke. She was telling me about how she “hated” people that “Always pass tests with A’s and say it was easy for them.”. I let it roll off pretty well.
A friend asked me to watch an episode of a television show called “House” about a Doctor practicing diagnostic medicine. He had a patient or patient boy friend, I forget which, that he recognized from the back cover of a book on advanced mathematics. Yet he was a delivery man for UPS or some such company. The doctor asked for an explanation and the man said he had been taking a certain medication that basically reduced his IQ by like 50 points. Dumfounded, the doctor asked why he would do such thing. The man then explained that he wanted a girl friend, to be able to hold a conversation with her, and to fit into society with her. He was able to do it with the pills and thought it was an excellent trade-off and would not stop doing it. If only there were such a pill!
I guess what I’m saying is I think I understand the issue of this opinion piece, but I don’t think individual therapy is the answer to it. Perhaps just better understanding of the vast diversity of humans that are out there ( so you can navigate around the incompatible ones).

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By: summarex http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2013/01/18/after-aaron-swartz/#comment-442090 Mon, 21 Jan 2013 10:45:29 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/?p=36171#comment-442090 I think the world would be a lot better off if all of these silicon bozos were to bump themselves off. What have they done except discover new ways of extracting time and money from people? Good riddance to them all.

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By: DougAnderson http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2013/01/18/after-aaron-swartz/#comment-442085 Mon, 21 Jan 2013 05:20:17 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/?p=36171#comment-442085 “As a clinical psychologist married to a hacker”

HAHAHAHAHAHA

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By: usagadfly http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2013/01/18/after-aaron-swartz/#comment-442084 Mon, 21 Jan 2013 03:50:49 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/?p=36171#comment-442084 Swartz killed himself while under ridiculous Federal indictments for violating one of the most openly corrupt areas of law in the USA — so-called “intellectual property” law. He essentially was going to be imprisoned for the rest of his life.

American copyright laws discourage invention, art and the enjoyment of the same by ordinary people. They do this by allowing “rights” to intellectual inventions to be seized, virtually in perpetuity, by financial cartels which have done absolutely nothing to create the “property” involved. Why?? Because they pay cash money from their share of the take with Government officials responsible for protecting the public. And the officials in turn create totally unprecedented, in the USA, “rights” for these financiers.

Copyright and patent laws exist to protect and encourage artistic creation and invention, especially for the benefit of the creators. Instead, these laws seldom benefit the creators and their families. They have created a new class of rentier who buys and sells ideas and artistic creation like so many pork bellies. These people stifle creation rather than encourage it. They restrict public access rather than promote it. They are directly responsible for the loss of Swartz to the country, they and their bought and paid for lackeys in the Federal Government.

Time to severely limit the transferability of copyrights and patents and to greatly reduce rights available to “secondary” owners. It is also necessary to greatly reduce available protected time on transferred “intellectual property” and to greatly restrict renewals of such rights.

And it would not hurt to strongly stiffen penalties for both paying and receiving bribes (“contributions”) by Federal officials.

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By: COindependent http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2013/01/18/after-aaron-swartz/#comment-442078 Sun, 20 Jan 2013 18:31:23 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/?p=36171#comment-442078 Perhaps the problem is that all of these “brainiacs” are overlooking the fact that regardless of how smart you are, and how well-developed your ideas for a business are, that you are subject to the whims of the market. Businesses and ideas are not developed in a vacuum, and no one controls the market in which you seek to exist.

There is very little written about the start-ups who blow through millions of dollars of capital, only to see their “business” dissolve due to the inability to monetize the model or secure market share sufficient to sustain it. That’s reality of every business,regardless ifone is built on a technology platform or not.

Perhaps if the market was approached from the perspective that you have a 10% chance of success, and that the odds are about 5% that anyone will want to acquire your successful business (whether or not at a premium); or that in five years (if you make it that far) it is still not going to be worth anything, young people might be better able to handle both success and failure. And, abject failure is an option regardless of one’s best efforts.

Secondly, running any business is hard work, and often requires that decisions be made that are very contrary to what any single individual would “like” to do. In a era where young people want to share their most intimate thoughts, sacrifice any privacy, wrapped in a sense of self-worth that is well beyond reality, it’s very difficult to admit that you either do not know what to do, or acknowledge that you are failing.

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By: Nullcorp http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2013/01/18/after-aaron-swartz/#comment-442077 Sun, 20 Jan 2013 18:28:43 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/?p=36171#comment-442077 Swartz most likely committed suicide not because of depression, but because he faced a very long federal prison sentence and crippling fines. His life was effectively over. Sometimes suicide can be a rational choice.

I would also not call any garden-variety software developer a “hacker” either. What Swartz did – breaking into secure facilities at MIT, and then breaking into their computer networks – was hacking. Coding a social network or working at a startup based around cheap event tickets is not hacking. Hacking is illegal and leads to prison sentences and fines. See above.

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By: Jose3 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2013/01/18/after-aaron-swartz/#comment-442076 Sun, 20 Jan 2013 17:44:58 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/?p=36171#comment-442076 Second song at songlobby.com is better off dead than in prison.

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By: tmc http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2013/01/18/after-aaron-swartz/#comment-442075 Sun, 20 Jan 2013 13:39:16 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/?p=36171#comment-442075 Print this on SlashDot or CNet tech news (techie sites) and it would be more affective.

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By: Robertla http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/2013/01/18/after-aaron-swartz/#comment-442070 Sun, 20 Jan 2013 10:31:11 +0000 http://blogs.reuters.com/mediafile/?p=36171#comment-442070 another thing you can do is, stop working with computers……….do something with your hands.

and get away from the culture.

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