MediaFile

Super Bowl ads: What’s $600 million between friends?

It’s almost time again for the Super Bowl, which means this is when all the talk starts about those famous, and famously expensive, commercials. Just how expensive? Kantar Media came out with a study today that shows Anheuser-Busch InBev, Pepsi, Walt Disney, General Motors, Coca-Cola have combined to spend nearly $600 million on Super Bowl ads over the last 10 years. For those of you bad with numbers, that’s more than half-a-billion dollars. Keep in mind, General Motors wasn’t even part of the game for 2009 or 2010.

This year, however, General Motors is back in a big way – leading a pack of auto makers who, as we pointed out in a story last week, will dominate this year’s game. Up to nine different auto manufacturers are expected to run spots this year. Kantar points out that five years ago only four car companies ran spots. Ten years ago only one car company bought time.

Kantar digs ups a few other interesting tidbits as well. Of course, everyone knows that prices have climbed over the last decade. But the amount of commercials running during the broadcast is also rising. Last year, the CBS broadcast contained a record 47 minutes 50 seconds of commercial time. A total of 104 individual messages aired. Who has time for a football game with all those advertisements?

It’s not just the big boys who are responsible for this ad bonanza. Kantar says that first-time advertisers account for about 20-25 percent of the ad roster. And some of these are relatively small organizations, at least when it comes to ad spending. One-third of Super Bowl advertisers put more than 10 percent of their full-year media budgets into the game.

With that as an appetizer, let the countdown to this year’s game begin.

WSJ defies newspaper ad trends

DOWJONES-NEWSCORP/Newspaper publishers are still laboring to reverse a massive decline in advertising revenue – the Newspaper Association of America reported that total industry ad revenue fell 6% in Q2 — but you sure wouldn’t know it over at The Wall Street Journal.

Wall Street Journal Publisher Les Hinton sent around an email (posted on Romenesko) touting the paper’s eye-popping 17% increase in print and online ad revenue in the quarter ending September versus the same period a year ago.  Print advertising jumped 21% while online ad revenue advanced 29%.

Hinton notes that this is the Journal’s fourth consecutive quarter of year-over-year growth and attributes the rise in ad revenue to the new products and sections such as Greater New York.

Actually, Yahoo is not spending another $85 million on ads

The news that Yahoo is spending $75 million to $85 million on an ad blitz has provoked a wave of disparagement in the blogosphere, with many critics slamming Yahoo for throwing more money away on an ineffective marketing strategy.

But much of the outcry appears to stem from a misunderstanding.

YahooBannerThe $75 million to $85 million in advertising is actually part of the $100 million campaign that Yahoo announced in September; It does not represent an additional $75 million to $85 million in ad spending.

A Yahoo spokesperson confirmed that Yahoo has only spent between $15 million and $25 million on the “It’s You” ad campaign since it was rolled out in September, with the remainder of the $100 million budgeted for the new ads, which represent phase two of the campaign.

That NBC: so green and so healthy

For those of you annoyed by NBC Universal’s “Green Week” — that stretch when the company’s peacock logo turns an irritating shade of green and its programs carry some sort of tortured green storyline — then you may want to stop reading right here. But for those of you who love the idea, here’s some news: NBC Universal is coming back with another Green Week in November and this time it will be running a TV special called “Harmony” featuring The Prince of Wales.

It’s also decided that not only do we viewers need to take better care of our planet, we need to take a little better care of ourselves. So it has also decided to launch “Healthy Week.”  Here’s how NBC Universal described the effort, which kicks off on June 21:

Similar to NBCU’s successful “Green Weeks,” numerous online and on-air NBCU brands will go “healthy” for the week, focusing on the topics of nutritional literacy and fitness, joining a major national cultural conversation on this topic around personal health, healthcare, diet, fitness, and childcare.

Publicis takes control of Chevy advertising

chevy

Automotive advertising isn’t what it once was – but they are still important accounts when you can land them.

It looks as though Publicis, the French holding company, has brought home the rest of the Chevrolet creative business. After it was first reported in Adweek, Publicis today released a short statement confirming that “Publicis Worldwide is proud to announce that Chevrolet has decided to consolidate all its U.S. advertising with Publicis Worldwide U.S.A.”

The shift — essentially taking work on Chevy trucks from Campbell-Ewald and moving it to Publicis — isn’t a total surprise. GM recently pulled lead creative duties on Chevy cars from Interpublic’s Campbell-Ewald, too.  That also went to Publicis.

Apple’s Jobs: “Butterflies” and more jabs at Google

jobs1The media and industry analysts gathered at Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino, California, on Thursday got a heavy dose of commentary from CEO Steve Jobs on a range of subjects, representing probably his biggest mouthful in a single setting since returning from medical leave last summer.

In a session that lasted more than 90-minutes, including Q&A with reporters, a clearly energized Jobs expounded on the iPhone’s new system software, his nerves ahead of the iPad launch, Apple’s new role as a peddler of mobile advertising, and of course Google, the company’s nemesis du jour.

Jobs announced Apple new iAd platform, which thrusts the company into a small but fast-growing market where Google also has designs.  But Jobs made clear that his company had no plans to become a “worldwide ad agency,” and he acknowledged that Apple was indeed pursuing AdMob when Google swooped in to buy the mobile ad firm:

Interpublic bulking up in Brazil with CUBOCC deal

Brazil Carnival

Interpublic, home to agencies like McCann Worldgroup and DraftFCB, has acquired an shop in Sao Paulo, expanding its footprint in Brazil. Lowe Worldwide and McCann Erickson, among other IPG agencies, already have offices in Brazil, which, of course, is considered a hotspot for advertising and media growth.

The ad and marketing services agency, CUBOCC, concentrates on new media and digital marketing, which, in case you’ve been asleep for a very long time, is also considered a hotspot.

IPG didn’t release financial details, but said CUBOCC would stay a stand-along agency. Roberto Martini will continue to run the shop, which has a staff of about 106 and was started in 2004.

from Shop Talk:

Olympic Gold for Coke, McDonald’s and Visa

rings1When is Olympic sponsorship money well spent? A Performance Research poll shows it may depend on how the funds are used.

Coke, McDonald's and Visa dominate consumer awareness when it comes to the Olympics, according to a study by the Rhode Island-based research firm that evaluates the sponsorship industry.

Sixty-eight percent of Americans polled confirmed the Olympic sponsorship of Coke and McDonald's, followed closely by 66 percent for Visa, Performance Research said. Those three companies also were listed as having consumers' favorite Olympic TV commercials and doing the most to support the Games.

Post Super Bowl: Ads, ads and more ads

It’s tempting, as a media reporter, to become incredibly cynical as the Super Bowl rolls around each February. Endless pitches, endless studies, endless clips sent by public relations departments in the days leading up the the game.

Here’s the thing though: Advertisers aren’t dummies. The $3 million they shell out for Super Bowl ads often pays off. Just think of all the stories that ran before the game in your local newspaper or on your local TV newscast (or here at Reuters.com). Or consider the party you attended yesterday — most people probably stayed in front of the TV set during timeouts. Hear much talk about Super Bowl ads today around the water cooler? Thought so.

A ton of polls are out today rating the best and worst Super Bowl commercials. Snickers and Doritos seem to be faring well.  Focus on the Family? Ahhh, that ad didn’t seem to knock anybody’s socks off. Then again, it didn’t have to. Do a Google News search and look at how much was written about the group’s advertisement long before it aired. That’s good marketing.

No Super Bowl blues; expect big TV ratings

colts1The U.S. economy might be weak, but the Super Bowl still scores with consumers.

The CBS broadcast of the National Football League’s championship game on Feb. 7 between the Indianapolis Colts and New Orleans Saints should draw strong TV ratings, possibly challenging viewer levels not seen since the late 1990s.

“We’re looking at a big rating,” said Neal Pilson, former CBS Sports president and head of his own sports consulting firm. “The fact that the two conference championships got better than usual ratings usually indicates that there’s a lot of public interest.”

The NFC Championship game between New Orleans and the Minnesota Vikings drew 57.9 million viewers, ranking it as the most watched conference championship game since the 1981 contest between Dallas and San Francisco that featured “The Catch.” It was also the most heavily watched TV program, excluding Super Bowls, since the 1998 “Seinfeld” finale.