MediaFile

Tech wrap: Apple “spaceship” to tackle “weed” problem

Apple plans to build a circular “spaceship” building in hometown Cupertino — and be the best office building in the world, CEO Steve Jobs said. The ailing Jobs, formally on leave from the company, made his second public appearance in two days late on Tuesday to show off plans to the Cupertino city council. Apple has grown “like a weed” Jobs said, and needs a place to put roughly 12,000 people. The massive new structure would be in addition to the main campus at 1 Infinite Loop.

Facebook is providing European regulators with information about its use of facial recognition technology, in response to concerns about the company’s roll-out of the technology’s availability outside of the U.S.. Facebook said there was no “formal investigation” under way. The move comes after comments by Gerard Lommel, a Luxembourg member of the so-called Article 29 Data Protection Working Party, who said the group would study Facebook’s use of facial recognition technology for possible rules violations, according to a report in Bloomberg earlier on Wednesday.

EBay is hunting for acquisitions to speed up its development of image recognition and augmented reality features as the online retailer and auctioneer seeks to capitalize on the potential of mobile phones to help consumers make impulse purchases. Steve Yankovich, head of eBay mobile, told Reuters his division had the company’s full support to spend money on innovative technology, as the fastest growing part of eBay which is helping to renew the 15-year-old company’s image.

Research firm Gartner lowered its view on global PC market growth for 2011 to 9.3 percent this year, down from the 10.5 percent it previously forecast, due to economic uncertainties as well as a lack of compelling PC products.

For 24 hours on Wednesday, websites with more than 1 billion combined visits a day joined distribution companies to enable IPv6 — a new Internet protocol with 4 billion times as many addresses as the nearly exhausted pool of Internet addresses used today — on their main services. Google, Facebook, Akamai, Yahoo, Limelight Networks and Verisign were some of those taking part.

Tech wrap: Yahoo’s CEO-in-waiting?

David Kenny, managing partner of VivaKi, poses for photographers during the Cannes Lions 2009 International Advertising Festival June 24, 2009. REUTERS/Alain Issock New Yahoo board member Akamai President David Kenny is the obvious choice to replace struggling CEO Carol Bartz, writes The Wall Street Journal’s Kara Swisher. Kenny is smooth and well-liked, has deep advertising experience, has a long relationship with Yahoo and its co-founder Jerry Yang and has tech cred as a leader of one of the Internet’s most important infrastructure companies, regularly in contact with media giants, ad networks and video providers that are Akamai’s clients, Swisher argues.

Microsoft explained the delay in updating its new phone software, partly blaming handset manufacturers for the problem. Microsoft’s JoeBelfiore did not name names, but said the company had started the update and ran into problems on some newly manufactured phones that would not function properly afterward. Samsung, HTC and LG Electronics are the main handset makers of Windows phones. A more comprehensive update, code-named Mango, will be available later this year, featuring performance bumps, live updates and applications that can run in the background while users move onto other programs, he said.

Russian hacker attacks on the country’s biggest blog site and a spy agency’s warning to Gmail and Skype have raised fears that authorities are tightening their grip on dissent in a China-like assault on free speech ahead of next year’s election, writes Thomas Grove. “This is a test drive during a very important year to see if it’s possible to close down websites, in particular social networking sites in case of demonstrations,” said Andrei Soldatov, head of the think-tank Agentura.ru.

Netflix soars, investors cheer…then Web service crashes.

ReedHastings

It’s been a heady few months for Netflix, the DVD by-mail company fast becoming a online video streaming service. Yesterday, its third quarter numbers again beat Wall Street expectations as it revealed it is now the third largest video subscription service behind Comcast and DirecTV with nearly 17 million subscribers. Wall Street analysts at UBS and Oppenheimer, already in love with the company, upgraded it on Thursday morning helping to push shares to a new record high of $174.40 before closing at $172.69. To think you could have bought the stock for $47.56 exactly one year ago.

Analysts were m0st excited about the potential for Netflix’s video streaming-only service, which will do away with the heavy expense of delivering DVDs to subscribers homes across the country. In the words of Netflix Chief Executive Reed Hastings (here pictured):

“Three years ago, we were a DVD-by-mail company that offered some streaming.” “We are now a streaming company, which also offers DVD-by-mail.”