MediaFile

David Eun Exits AOL after Huff Po purchase

david-eunAnother high-level AOL executive is heading for the exit door after the company shifted its content strategy again with the $315 million acquisitionof the Huffington Post. David Eun (pictured left), the ex-Googler recruited by AOL Chief Executive Tim Armstrong to be president of AOL media and studios, is leaving. Eun is a causality of the Huff Po purchase that put the charismatic high profile  founder Arianna Huffington in charge of AOL’s content.

In a memo to AOL employees posted on AOL’s technology blog TechCrunch, Eun described how he and Armstrong tried to find a place for Eun at AOL after the acquisition.

“I came to AOL last year to be the leader of the media organization. With the historic acquisition of The Huffington Post, my role and responsibilities as President, AOL Media are changing. Tim and I have discussed at length how I might continue within the new organizational structure, but ultimately there isn’t a role that matches what I am seeking to do.”

Eun was not immediately available to comment.

It’s the latest of a long list of switches and departures at AOL as the company attempts to turn itself into a media powerhouse dependent mainly on advertising revenue and tries to move away from its lucrative but dying dial-up business. At first, AOL’s  Armstrong made a big deal about scooping up journalists to turn out original content around politics, sports, health and entertainment. That idea fell by the wayside as AOL decided to either outright buy that content  — such as the purchase of the influential tech blog TechCrunch and Huff Post – or simply outsource it.

PaidContent’s Staci D. Kramer has the low down on the AOL executive shuffle and changes to the structure. Eun tells Kramer: “It’s not easy but I go back to why did I come. The job I came here for isn’t exactly the job that’s going to be available after.”

UPDATE: AOL News hires ABCNews.com guy as new leader

AOL_Say_CanvasThere’s been an exodus of reporters and editors leaving AOL News of late but today the company snaggeda new leader. Jonathan Dube has been named senior vice president and general manager of AOL News & Information heading up its news and content division which includes the tech, finance, and sports group.  Dube will report in to David Eun, president of AOL Media & Studios.

Dube was most recently at ABCNews.com where he responsible for, among other things,  editorial content.

“Equal parts journalist and business strategist, Jonathan is adept at building online content partnerships and creating exceptional user experiences,” Eun said in a statement. “I am delighted that he will be taking over the management of our news teams as we continue to innovate and create original content at scale for our users.”

UPDATE: AOL loses key editors; still says it’s home of premium content

AAOL_Say_CanvasOL is losing more key writers and editors, including the head of AOL News. Mike Nizza the editor in chief of AOL News is decamping for News Corp.   World editor James Graff is departing to take the managing editor position at The Week and James Burnett, AOL’s enterprise editor,  left for Rolling Stone.  Daily Finance Senior Writer Sam Gustin is headed to Wired.

It’s a blow to AOL which has boasted  of becoming an online media and entertainment powerhouse known for its premium content.

AOL emailed the following statement:  “We are building a world class organization and are committed to being a leading producer of high quality original content. And we are growing our organization everyday. ”

Lots of traffic, but show us the money

Arianna Huffington and James Pitaro photo courtsey of Beet.TV

Arianna Huffington and James Pitaro photo courtesy of Beet.TV

Traditional media companies have spent the better part of two years trying to cope with the double whammy of recessionary forces washing away advertising revenue and the changing habits of consumers. So how do a bunch of young buck  Internet companies see themselves ?  As media companies!

Well sort of. Not, you know, old school media companies.  Rather, “technology enabled media companies,” as  James Pitaro, vice president, media at Yahoo phrased it when pressed on Tuesday during a  panel discussion about the future of media hosted by I Want Media.

Pitaro was on hand with a bunch of other big names like Arianna Huffington of The Huffington Post;  David Eun, AOL Media president; and Josh Cohen, senior business project manager at Google News. (Go here for the complete lineup).