MediaFile

Tech wrap: LulzSec hackers seek greener pastures

The LulzSec group of rogue hackers threatened to steal classified information from governments, banks and other high-ranking establishments, teaming up with the Anonymous hacker activist group to cause more serious trouble in an escalation of their cyber attacks.

LulzSec had said last Friday that it hacks to have fun and to warn people that personal information is not safe in the hands of Internet companies. But two days later, Lulz said its top priority was to leak “classified government information, including email spools and documentation.”

The FBI said it is working to bulk up its cyber division as hackers focus on higher-profile targets, but is at the mercy of a Congress struggling to cut the massive budget deficit.

Nokia CEO Stephen Elop unveiled the N9 smartphone that uses software the firm plans to ditch, a move analysts said would probably condemn the device to obscurity. At a telecoms conference in Singapore, Elop reiterated that Nokia would launch its first smartphone using Microsoft’s Windows platform later this year, even as he unveiled the new all-screen N9 smartphone, which uses a platform called MeeGo.

The decision on Monday by the body that governs Internet domain names to stop restricting them to suffixes like .com and .gov, will change the way companies interact with consumers and how much they’ll be paying to do so, writes Martinne Geller. With the number of possible domains growing exponentially, so too might the number of registrations in companies’ portfolios, according to industry experts. And battles between companies that both have legitimate claims may arise.

Bonnie and Yonni — Disney dynamic duo, immortalized

Bonnie and Yonni are unlikely to go down in the history books as among the nimblest of partners-in-crime. But they might have earned a prominent place among the most candid.

Accoding to U.S. prosecutors, Bonnie Hoxie — an assistant to Disney’s PR chief — and boyfried Yonni Sebbag hatched a less-than-elaborate scheme in which she gets her hands on confidential and potentially stock market-moving material   –  Disney financial information — and passes it on to Sebbag.  Like the Wall Street equivalent of a pusher, Sebbag set out to construct a network of hedge-fund consumers for that info who could  then profit off of it, according to court documents filed.

Set for life. Easy.

Thing is, on the day of the alleged crime (the release of Disney’s second quarter earnings), Hoxie — according to prosecutors — sent messages to Sebbag from her work email account and from her personal cellphone.  Several of the hedge funds contacted by Sebbag — perhaps spooked by the ever-widening fallout from the Galleon insider trading probe — went straight to the Feds. Sebbag himself got fooled by an undercover FBI agent into a face-to-face meeting in New York during which money allegedly changed hands. He told the agent he’d suspected others that had contacted him of being Feds (he was right there).