MediaFile

$800 per family for 3D TV glasses?

ces 3d tv

Big time gadget makers filled this years this year’s Consumer Electronics Show with 3D TV’s,  promising that consumers can enjoy an “Avatar”-like experience at home some time this year. And the news is even better — research firm Gartner says that it only costs about 15 percent more to make a 3D TV than a regular flat screen,  so the TVs may be affordable.

Here’s the thing. The glasses. You must have them. And they are fragile. And they cost a lot. Like, more than the TV itself, if you’ve got a big family.  Gartner analyst Van Baker explained on a conference call:

“If you are talking about a family of four, that’s $400-$800 you are going to be spending on the micro-shutter glasses. Not to mention that the glasses can be lost and can be broken.”

Ouch. But can’t I just use the movie theater glasses I stole… i mean… forgot to return, from, you know, “Avatar?”

“Unfortunately if it’s an LCD television, those already have polarizing filters built into them, so the glasses that you use when you go to the movie cannot be used. You have to use the micro-shutter glasses that actually open and close shutters on a very rapid basis to give you the 3D effect. And those glasses are expensive. the industry is going to have to come to grips with how they (deal with that).”

from Commentaries:

Twitter backlash foretold

Technology market research firm Gartner Inc has published the 2009 "Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies," its effort to chart out what's hot or not at the cutting edge of hi-tech jargon. It's just one of an annual phalanx of reports that handicap some 1,650 technologies or trends in 79 different categories for how likely the terms are to make it into mainstream corporate parlance.

Jackie Fenn, the report's lead analyst and author of the 2008 book "Mastering the Hype Cycle," delivers the main verdict:

Technologies at the Peak of Inflated Expectations during 2009 include cloud computing, e-books (such as from Amazon and Sony) and internet TV (for example, Hulu), while social software and microblogging sites (such as Twitter) have tipped over the peak and will soon experience disillusionment among corporate users.