MediaFile

Blue Jeans Network’s chipping away at Cisco with video technology

Blue Jeans Network, a small rival of network equipment giant Cisco, is taking John Chambers by his word.

Cisco CEO Chambers’ mantra that video is the new voice all depends on how easy and simple it is to start a video call.

Blue Jeans, which claims it is the leader in making video services work together, says its new browser access technology does just that. (http://bluejeans.com/works-with/browser.)

All it takes is a browser and camera to join video meetings  or audio connections thus allowing technology, which is often proprietary, to work with services that are often not compatible, its CEO Krish Ramakrishnan said.

So callers on Skype can hook up with people using Polycom for example

Video calls and meetings have yet to see widespread adoption beyond the corporate boardroom but new services and software are enabling a high-speed Internet connection and a standard desktop computer, smartphone or tablet can provide quality similar to expensive systems.

Missing iPhone saga continues; police said to be involved

iphoneblahSure, it was one of the busiest weeks on the tech earnings calendar, but despite a crush of important indicators about the health of the industry, all anyone seems to care about was that famously wayward iPhone, which caused such a stir earlier in the week.

And just as it seemed the story was about to peter out, there was a report Friday that the police are now investigating the case.

If you’ve been living in a cave for the past week (ignoring David Letterman and publicity-seeking airlines) and missed all the hubbub, here’s the recap: young Apple engineer accidentally leaves a apparent prototype of fourth-generation iPhone in a Silicon Valley bar, where the device is recovered by an unknown individual, who turns around and sells it to gadget site Gizmodo for $5,000. Gizmodo promptly reveals to the world all the glories of the new iPhone, complete with pictures. Apple asks for, and gets, the device back.

Bartz’s idea of a joke: Yahoo could buy New York Times

Wall Street analysts pestered new Yahoo CEO Carol Bartz with all kinds of questions during her first quarterly earnings call, and she answered as candidly as she could, frequently pointing out the fact that she’s still learning the ropes and getting to know the business.

But Bartz couldn’t resist the chance to crack a joke when Piper Jaffray analyst Gene Munster asked her about Yahoo’s roadmap for 2009, and whether investors can expect any guidelines about when things might start rolling.

“Well, Gene, I thought I’d buy The New York Times tomorrow,” Bartz said.

Gawker dumps three blogs in advertising winter

ship.jpgNick Denton’s Gawker Media is parting with three of its blogs: political gossip site Wonkette, travel site Gridskipper and music site Idolator, dumping ballast in a stormy ad market.    
 
Denton put it simply in a memo to employees, first seen on Silicon Alley Insider:    

Why these three sites? To be blunt: they each had their editorial successes; but someone else will have better luck selling the advertising than we did. … it would be naive to think that we can merely power through an advertising recession. We need to concentrate our energies … on the sites with the greatest potential for audience and advertising. 
    

Here’s the details:
* Buzznet, a music social network, is buying Idolator after snapping up its main rival Stereogum.