MediaFile

Sports Illustrated unveils another digital app subscription plan

sports illustratedTime Inc’s Sports Illustrated unveiled the details of another subscription plan for the Samsung Galaxy tablet computer and Android based smartphones — the print version of its  parent Time Warner Inc’s “TV everywhere” idea currently touted by Chief Executive Jeffrey Bewkes.  Like TV Everywhere, magazines everywhere charges one price for access to content across print and digital platforms.

The SI digital and print subscription plan comes on the heels of  a Time Inc announcement about a similar subscription plan for SI and People for  Hewlett-Packard’s forthcoming tablet device the TouchPad.

“The key to the media business is habituation,” said Time Inc EVP and Chief Digital Officer Randall Rothenberg.

Indeed, the SI digital app subscription plan is available everywhere with one glaring exception: Apple’s iTunes store.

That was the elephant in the room this morning when  Time Inc executives showed off the SI app on various devices. Currently, only single copy editions of SI are available on the iPad and iPhone. It’s a sore point among publishing executives who depend on subscriptions for circulation and more important, advertising revenue.

Where’s Leo? At HQ, want a picture?

US-ORACLE-SAP-LAWSUITAfter weeks of sometimes comical coverage on the whereabouts of new HP CEO Leo Apotheker — a farce that had come to be know as “Where’s Leo?” — the company was likely happy that the subject was almost ignored in the aftermath of its earnings report on Monday. Almost.

Apotheker’s precise location became an issue when Oracle made it known that it was trying to subpoena HP’s head man as part of its high-profile lawsuit against SAP, where Apotheker was previously CEO. Oracle, waging a skillful PR war against its newest foe, claimed Apotheker was ducking the subpoena, which would have put him on the stand in federal court in Oakland, California. Oracle even hired private investigators to track him down.

HP, for its part, refused to divulge his location, and accused Oracle of harassing Apotheker. SAP called the hunt for him a “sideshow.”

Palm Chief promises “hits” for HP

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Six months after Hewlett-Packard announced it was buying smartphone pionners Palm  for $1 billion, technology watchers are still waiting to see just what emerges from the high-profile marriage.

Palm chief Jon Rubinstein still isn’t tipping his hand on any details around smartphones and tablets that are due next year from the new HP unit. But he certainly made no effort to manage expectations on Tuesday at the Web 2.0 conference in San Francisco.

“It’s absolutely a hits business…We have several products that will clearly be hits when they come out,” said Rubinstein, who predicted “tremendous growth” in devices based on webOS, the Palm platform that HP acquired when it bought the company this year for roughly $1 billion.

HP’s Slate tablet: The early reviews

Hewlett-Packard, at long last, has released the tablet computer first glimpsed at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas last January, and it is a decidedly different take than what we’ve seen so far in the tablet space. Basically a business netbook sans a keyboard. That’s a far cry from Apple’s iPad — and maybe that’s the point.

The initial reviews of the HP Slatslate2e 500 are starting to trickle in and they are something of a mixed bag. There is plenty to debate, to be sure. The device sports Windows 7, Wi-Fi but no 3G, and has no app store link-up. But it features a digital stylus pen, has a relatively fast processor and plenty of room for storage. And then there is the little matter of that hefty $799 price tag, which has surprised more than a few people, given that the iPad starts at $499.

HP is not even pretending to be targeting the same buyers as the iPad. And a more interesting HP vs Apple showdown is likely to come next year, when HP releases the webOS tablet that everyone is curious to get a peek at.

With all eyes on Hurd, plenty of praise for new employer

USA/It may have been the most anticipated tech earnings conference call of the year.

It’s a good bet many many folks in Silicon Valley, and tech investors in general, were dialed in to Oracle’s presentation on Thursday, eager to hear the first public utterances of new president Mark Hurd, the recently exiled CEO of technology giant Hewlett-Packard.

And it may have been a bit painful for Hurd’s former colleagues at HP to hear him quickly lavish praise on his new employer:

“I don’t believe there is any other company in the industry better positioned than Oracle,” Hurd said in one of his first public statements as president of the world’s No. 3 software maker.

from Summit Notebook:

Intel, HP: TVs should get smarter

Intel, Sony and Google are expected to unveil on Thursday a "smart TV": an Internet-ready, super content machine that -- if the hype is to be believed -- will let viewers watch Celebrity Apprentice, tweet, and respond to emails at the same time. On Wednesday, Intel's sales and marketing chief -- while keeping his cards close to the vest -- couldn't resist a little plug for the general concept of Internet TVs.

"The smart TV category is going to take off.  It just makes all the sense in the world," Thomas Kilroy told the Reuters Global Technology Summit. "Why would you want to compromise when you've got a nice big screen, you're watching TV and you want to access information and keep that program on instead of bringing in another device. "

"It's our belief that there's going to be a fundmental shift that happens every 30 to 40 years or more...and it's about to happen with televisions," he added. "I actually remember the black and white days. I remember in my house when we went from black and white to color and my gosh, what an experience."

HP: Think before you ‘dis’ print(ing)

HP
All those reminders to “think before you print” and the use of the email for most official correspondence might make you believe the office printer is no longer so important. The reality, however, is that we print more than ever, according to Vyomesh Joshi, Executive VP of Hewlett-Packard’s imaging and printing group, who sat down with the Reuters Global Technology Summit in San Francisco.

The truth is, even company executives don’t realize might be surprised much printing and printing-related is going on, he says.

IT managers will have absolutely no idea how much they spend on imaging and printing… On average, 6 percent of their revenue is spent on imaging and printing.

Dell says it won’t chase Apple in tablet race

dellstreakThe iPad is officially on the market, and here come its rivals. Dell and HP, among many others, are planning to bring their own touchscreen tablets to consumers some time this year.

Dell will launch a 5-inch tablet (said to be called “Streak,” although the company has not officially bestowed a name) in the next three to six months with a yet-to-be-named wireless carrier (AT&T would make a lot of sense, given that it will carry Dell’s first U.S. smartphone later this year).

Neeraj Choubey, general manager of Dell’s tablet division, said the company deliberately stayed clear of the iPad launch so as not to be too closely associated with the device.  The iPad, at 9.7 inches, is nearly twice the size of Dell’s tablet.

What’s an IPad? HP tries to drum up buzz for its “slate”

hpblahWith iPad hysteria perhaps starting to fade — or at least come back down from the stratosphere — Hewlett-Packard chimed in Monday to remind everybody in the media that, hey, we’ve also got a tablet on the way.

HP is the world’s largest PC maker and is not used to playing second fiddle to anyone in that space. So it will be interesting to see what kind of excitement the company can generate for its still unnamed touchscreen “slate device,” which is headed to consumers later this year.

Here’s a quick preview: YouTube Preview Image

HP’s tablet, which runs on Windows, seems to be emphasizing what the iPad lacks, namely flash compatibility and the ability to expand storage.

CES: HP demos Android smartbook

qualcommThe nascent smartbook market got a big nudge forward on Friday, courtesy of Hewlett-Packard, the world’s biggest personal computer maker.

Todd Bradley, executive vice president of HP’s PC division, turned up on stage at the Consumer Electronics Show during a keynote address by Qualcomm CEO Paul Jacobs to demo a device based on Qualcomm’s Snapdragon chip and running Google’s mobile Android software.

There was no formal product unveiling, but HP showed off a smartbook with multitouch capability, and Bradley spoke with apparent interest on the  category, which is just beginning to build steam.