MediaFile

Media Moguls to iPad: How do I love thee? Let me count the ways…

The relationship between Apple and the media industry has had its ups and downs, as Apple expanded its reach and exerted increasing control over businesses like music and television program distribution.

But when it comes to Apple’s newest gadget, industry honchos go ga-ga.

We’re midway through the first day of the All Things Digital conference in California’s Palos Verdes on Wednesday, and already the event is turning into something of an iPad lovefest, with heartfelt paeans to the iPad as common as Rolexes at the exclusive gathering of business bigwigs.

Jeffrey Katzenberg, CEO of DreamWorks Animation SKG, said the iPad was destined to become Apple boss Steve Jobs’ greatest legacy.

“The intuitive nature of it is so spectacular,” Katzenberg told the audience, noting he ditched his laptop PC entirely and now relies solely on an iPad and a Blackberry.

Comcast COO Steve Burke sounded equally head-over-heels, describing the iPad as “elegant” and “extraordinary.”

from Summit Notebook:

Dell: stay tuned for “Streak”

It's hard to tell how much anticipation there is out there for Dell's upcoming "Streak" micro-tablet. The No. 3 PC maker's latest foray into a consumer arena that Apple's iPad has essentially helped create is set to hit stores this summer in the United States.

Consumer business unit chief Steve Felice told the Reuters Global Technology Summit that Dell isn't interested in becoming the No. 1 player in the smartphone and tablet mobile devices categories, where Apple and Google are waging a very high-profile war. But the former leader in personal computers fully intends to be a "top-tier player".

streak1"We look at this whole thing as an experience between the computer and the remote device. We still view these as complementary devices," he said.

Don’t look for Sony’s iPad killer any time soon

stringer

Don’t expect to see Sony’s response to Apple’s iPad tablet computer any time soon.

We talked to Sony Chief Executive Howard Stringer, who was in town to discuss the unveiling of Google TV, the  initiative that marries the Web to television. Stringer was very excited about that product, which will appear first in Sony TVs later this year, giving the electronics maker a head start against what is expected to be a future filled with Internet-enabled TVs. While noting that Sony’s digital book reader product sales are still strong, he seemed much less thrilled about any iPad-killer plans for Sony, maker of the popular Vaio line of computers.

Everybody’s now making one aren’t they? Tablets, tablets, as far as the eye can see.

from Summit Notebook:

Is Apple in Intel’s future?

Apple developed the processor for it's recently launched iPad tablet PC in-house. Intel was left waiting on the sidelines but change may be in store. Future tablets from other device makers, and maybe even Apple, could prove to be a lucrative for the world's largest chipmaker. And why not, Intel already makes the microprocessors that are used in more than three quarters of the world's PCs. Tom Kilroy, Intel senior vice president and general manager of sales and marketing, says "wait til Computex" for a big announcement. So, what's likely to come out of the industry trade show this June in Taipei? Any thoughts? Click below to hear what Kilroy had to say in San Francisco at the 2010 Reuters Global Technology Summit.

Intel on Tablet Opportunities from Reuters TV on Vimeo.

Want an in with Kleiner? Send a drawing

For Matt Murphy, partner with influential Silicon Valley Venture fund Kleiner Perkins and point person on the firm’s iFund, old-school is still the way to go.

During an interview at the Reuters technology summit, the VC said picking the right startups to back was tough, given that he had received 8,000 business plans for iFund, which invests in iPhone and iPad applications.

The onslaught of business plans from app developers escalated to almost 500 per day when the fund expanded to $200 million in March.

Apple’s Jobs: “Butterflies” and more jabs at Google

jobs1The media and industry analysts gathered at Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino, California, on Thursday got a heavy dose of commentary from CEO Steve Jobs on a range of subjects, representing probably his biggest mouthful in a single setting since returning from medical leave last summer.

In a session that lasted more than 90-minutes, including Q&A with reporters, a clearly energized Jobs expounded on the iPhone’s new system software, his nerves ahead of the iPad launch, Apple’s new role as a peddler of mobile advertising, and of course Google, the company’s nemesis du jour.

Jobs announced Apple new iAd platform, which thrusts the company into a small but fast-growing market where Google also has designs.  But Jobs made clear that his company had no plans to become a “worldwide ad agency,” and he acknowledged that Apple was indeed pursuing AdMob when Google swooped in to buy the mobile ad firm:

Dell says it won’t chase Apple in tablet race

dellstreakThe iPad is officially on the market, and here come its rivals. Dell and HP, among many others, are planning to bring their own touchscreen tablets to consumers some time this year.

Dell will launch a 5-inch tablet (said to be called “Streak,” although the company has not officially bestowed a name) in the next three to six months with a yet-to-be-named wireless carrier (AT&T would make a lot of sense, given that it will carry Dell’s first U.S. smartphone later this year).

Neeraj Choubey, general manager of Dell’s tablet division, said the company deliberately stayed clear of the iPad launch so as not to be too closely associated with the device.  The iPad, at 9.7 inches, is nearly twice the size of Dell’s tablet.

What’s an IPad? HP tries to drum up buzz for its “slate”

hpblahWith iPad hysteria perhaps starting to fade — or at least come back down from the stratosphere — Hewlett-Packard chimed in Monday to remind everybody in the media that, hey, we’ve also got a tablet on the way.

HP is the world’s largest PC maker and is not used to playing second fiddle to anyone in that space. So it will be interesting to see what kind of excitement the company can generate for its still unnamed touchscreen “slate device,” which is headed to consumers later this year.

Here’s a quick preview: YouTube Preview Image

HP’s tablet, which runs on Windows, seems to be emphasizing what the iPad lacks, namely flash compatibility and the ability to expand storage.

from Shop Talk:

Window shopping on the iPad, brought to you by eBay

eBay_iPad_1Shopping in front of a computer or small hand-held device got you down? EBay says it has the answer with its new iPad app, completely redesigned for ultimate browsing on Apple's hippest new tablet.

The app has already been downloaded "tens of thousands" of times  since the launch of the iPad on Saturday, said eBay's vice president of mobile, Steven Yankovich. Currently, eBay is No 11 in the list of free iPad apps, he said.

The app allows shoppers to see high-resolution images of their favorite products, even in thumbnails, and an easy-to-navigate two screen system simplifies the buying process.

from Richard Baum:

The surprising iPad

ipad

After all the previews, reviews and hype, by the time UPS delivered my iPad just after noon there seemed little room left for any surprises. Still, there were plenty of unexpected pleasures and unanticipated concerns. Here's a selection:

The screen is stunning. Colors are breathtakingly beautiful.

The screen is worrying. Your iPhone might survive a naked ride in your pocket or a gentle drop to the floor, but the sheer size of the iPad screen lends it a feeling of fragility. It will be interesting to see how long it takes for reports of breakages take to come in and what impact that will have on undecided customers.

I'm less sure of its uses than I expected to be. I'll be taking my iPad on the bus to work on Monday, but I'm not convinced it will be as comfortable a read as I'd hoped. Remember how Steve Jobs rested it on his crossed leg at the launch event? You can't sit like that on my bus.