$60 video games? Do the math, says Zelnick

December 5, 2008

How do entertainment retailers come up with the prices they charge? Why is a movie theater ticket $10, a music CD $15, a rental DVD $3-$5 and a top video game $60?

from DealZone:

Shane Kim’s crystal ball: videogame deals, new content

December 3, 2008

Microsoft's videogame chief Shane Kim came by our New York office this morning for the Reuters Media Summit and shared his thoughts on XBox 360 sales ("cautiously optimistic") and the outlook for the gaming industry amid the economic doom-and-gloom ("Who knows, maybe flat performance will be considered a remarkable achievement").

Video game console obituaries premature – Microsoft

December 3, 2008

Gaming insiders who have given consoles the death sentence, get a life!

Shane Kim, VP of Strategy and Business Development at Microsoft Corp’s Interactive Entertainment Business, said it’s too soon to write off the Xbox.

Sony offers big PS3 price cut, if you can get the credit

November 25, 2008

With Black Friday only a few days away and projections for the holiday shopping season bleak, it’s not surprising that Sony is making a price cut move on its PlayStation 3 video game console to lure cash-strapped shoppers.

from DealZone:

Chief Yahoo

November 18, 2008

Back in July, when Microsoft walked away from Yahoo, conspiracy theorists surmised that the software giant would eventually come back to bid again at half the price. The Chief Yahoo - that's the title Jerry Yang is reclaiming after saying last night he would step down as CEO - is no longer in a position to block a deal, so it's fair to assume Microsoft and its bulging mound of cash could return for another bite. 
 
Yang has been talking with the board, which includes activist investor Carl Icahn, about stepping down since before Google pulled out of a search advertising deal with his company earlier this month, according to a person familiar with the talks. 
 
Yahoo's share price jumped after the news on Yang. That could just be relief that he is going, or it could be renewed hope of a deal. So a dealmaker could take the reins of the Internet company, which has already seen great swaths of its brain trust flee in the months since the initial Microsoft bid failed. 
 
A source said the process of finding a successor to Yang could take anywhere from four to 12 weeks, and analysts have suggested a star-studded cast of candidates, including former AOL chief Jon Miller, News Corp President and Chief Operating Officer Peter Chernin, former eBay Chief Executive Meg Whitman, former Yahoo COO Dan Rosensweig, and Yahoo President Sue Decker.
 

Zuckerberg, edition Web 2.0

November 7, 2008

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg may have traded in his Adidas flip-flops for tennis shoes, but he was as coy as ever when it came to talking about the social network.  On stage at the Web 2.0 Summit in San Francisco, host John Batelle asked Zuckerberg about Dubai, referring to rumors that Facebook CFO Gideon Yu was in the Middle East seeking financing from the sheikhs.

Yahoo rejected again (and again)

November 6, 2008

Yahoo: Shun me once, shame on you. Shun me three times in one day, shame on… uh, shame on all of you.

Microsoft looks past Vista at Windows 7

October 28, 2008

Microsoft finally lifted the curtain on Windows 7 to an enthusiastic audience of developers at the company’s Professional Developers Conference in Los Angeles.

Ballmer still dreaming of a Yahoo acquisition?

October 16, 2008

ballmergartner.jpgHere’s Microsoft’s Steve Ballmer during a keynote interview at a Gartner’s ITXpo, where — in case you somehow missed the news, the chatter, and the stock market reaction — he reportedly said a deal with Yahoo may still make economic sense.

More Boo-Hoo in Yahoo shares

October 9, 2008

yahoo-sign.jpgWho was it that wrote about the “The Road Not Taken”? Robert Frost?

That’s somewhat ironic, because you have to figure Yahoo shareholders are feeling pretty frosty toward Yahoo’s management now that its stock price is wallowing around $13 , near five-year lows, amid a weakening display advertising outlook.