MediaFile

WSJ pushes further into video with free app

The Wall Street Journal has launched a new video application “WSJ Live” that pulls from the content from its stable of live programming.

WSJ Live is another push from the Journal into video programming — which represents some of its most valuable advertising inventory, said Alisa Bowen, general manager of the Wall Street Journal Digital Network. Ad inventory on the video network has been sold out and WSJ Live is free to watch on WSJ.com. That is part of the reason that the Journal plans to keep WSJ Live free of charge, unlike some of its other content, but that could change in the future, Bowen said.

Six advertisers have signed up for the sponsorship of the app: Aetna, AT&T, Citi Simplicity, Cognizant, FedEx, and Fidelity.

The Journal has been one of the longest running newspapers in the U.S. to charge for online content, a hybrid model that allows readers to access some content for free.

WSJ Live draws upon the staff of the Dow Jones’ newsroom and currently airs about four hours of  live programming (which is also available on demand) every day that includes News Hub, Lunch Break and Mean Street.

Tech wrap: Panasonic profits shaken by quake

Japan’s Panasonic Corp forecast on Monday its full-year operating profit would drop 11 percent to 270 billion yen ($3.4 billion) in the year to March 2012, after the earthquake and tsunami in northern Japan hit production and sales. Like many of its rivals, Panasonic delayed its profit forecast due to lack of clarity about the effects of the quake.

Facebook’s U.S. advertising revenue will total roughly $2.2 billion in 2011, displacing Yahoo Inc to collect the biggest slice of online display advertising dollars, according to a new study. Facebook’s U.S. advertising revenue will give it a 17.7 percent share of the market for graphical display ads that appear on websites, according to a report released on Monday by research firm eMarketer.

The Internet body that oversees domain names voted on Monday to end restricting them to suffixes like .com or .gov and will receive applications for new names from January 12 next year with the first approvals likely by the end of 2012. Experts say corporations should be among the first to register, resulting in domain names ending in brands like .toyota, .apple or .coke. Besides the $185,000 to apply, individuals or organizations will have to show a legitimate claim to the names they are buying.

Tech wrap: Microsoft earnings fail to excite

Microsoft reported a dip in quarterly sales of its core Windows operating system, mirroring a recent downturn in personal computers. The world’s largest software company met Wall Street profit estimates, as strong sales of its Office suite of applications and game systems took up the slack. “Microsoft to me is no longer a growth stock but it is a very attractive value stock. They continue to generate tremendous free cash flow. Their balance sheet is really unmatched,” Channing Smith of Capital Advisors said.

Sony could face legal action across the globe after it delayed disclosing a security breach of its popular PlayStation Network, infuriating gamers and sending the firm’s shares down nearly 5 percent in Tokyo Thursday.

Mobile privacy safeguards should also extend to third party application developers, two lawmakers said after reviewing the practices of four major U.S. wireless carriers.

CES: Panasonic hopes to sell 1 million 3D TVs in first year

You may only have just heard about 3D TV, but Panasonic is already expecting it to be a hit with consumers. Yoshi Yamada, CEO of Panasonic’s North America unit, told us the Japanese gadget maker hopes to sell 1 million units — or more — and they won’t even hit the stores until the spring.

It’s not clear yet how much more the 3D TVs will cost than big screen LCDs that many people just bought to replace their old tube TVs.

And we can’t resist mentioning — again — the giant 152-inch LCD TV television that Panasonic is showing off here at the Consumer Electronics Show. Big is back, in emphatic fashion.

CES: Gadgets from the Consumer Electronics Show

The Consumer Electronics Show is underway, with myriad companies announcing new devices and services. Here’s a sample, as seen through the lens of Reuters photographers Mario Anzuoni and Steve Marcus.

intel

the Infoscape concept at the Intel booth

pana

Panasonic’s 3d Camcorder. Sure, it kind of looks like a “viewmaster”. But its one of the keys to creating 3D content for consumers to see when they buy a 3D TV.

oled

A super-thin OLED screen from LG Electronics. OLED (Organic light emitting diode) screens are clear and bright, but TVs with the screens are still mostly small and expensive.

CES: Panasonic’s really big TV screen (video)

This video does not do justice to Panasonic’s 152-inch HD TV, on display at CES. 3D TV is getting all of the buzz, but this screen just makes you stop and ponder, you know, everything. I only included that guy on the left for perspective. Its a big doggone screen.

Dell unveils new rugged laptop

Most people beat up their laptops and eventually pay the price. But not so with an emerging class of so-called rugged laptops. Dell is releasing its second-generation fully-rugged model – the Latitude E6400 XFR – and the company says it provides even better protection from rain, dust and dirt, drops and spills and temperature extremes.

The 14.1-inch, 8.5 pound, touch-screen unit – which starts at $4,299 – is designed for military, first responders, oil and gas workers, factory floors and other areas where you would never dare drag a standard laptop. It’s a bit lighter and thinner than the first-generation XFR, and can get more than 13 hours of battery life with an optional 12-cell battery slice.

The unit’s chassis has what the company calls a “Ballistic Armor” protection system that Dell says provides twice the impact strength of traditional magnesium alloy. The laptop should be able to withstand a tumble from as high as four feet when closed and powered down, and three feet when open and working.