Tech wrap: Google bypassed Safari privacy settings

February 17, 2012

Google landed in hot water over revelations that the search giant and ad companies had bypassed the privacy settings of millions of people using Apple’s Safari Web browser, using special computer code that tracked their movements online. Stanford researcher Jonathan Mayer discovered the code. Subsequently, a technical adviser to the Wall Street Journal found that ads on 22 of the top 100 websites installed the Google tracking code on a test computer, and ads on 23 sites installed it on an iPhone browser. Google disabled the code after being contacted by the Journal, the newspaper said, and Google issued a statement, saying: “The Journal mischaracterizes what happened and why. We used known Safari functionality to provide features that signed-in Google users had enabled. It’s important to stress that these advertising cookies do not collect personal information.”

Google makes a TV ad

May 8, 2009

Google built its business on the advertising shift from traditional media, like TV and newspapers, to the Internet.

Google’s Chrome out of beta, but only Windows-friendly

December 11, 2008

Google has decided its Chrome Web browser is all grown up-or. Or at least it has outgrown its beta label.